Two Guantanamo Guards Punished for Prisoner Abuse

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 7, 2004 | Go to article overview

Two Guantanamo Guards Punished for Prisoner Abuse


Byline: Guy Taylor, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Two Army guards at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have received "administrative punishments" for abusing prisoners since the base's maximum-security military prison was created in late 2001.

Military officials yesterday said the incidents, which involved Army reservists quarreling with angry prisoners, occurred more than a year ago and were unrelated to the widely publicized abuse of prisoners at the Abu Ghraib military prison in Iraq.

The abuses at Guantanamo, where U.S. forces are holding about 600 "enemy combatants," most of whom were captured in Afghanistan in 2001, were handled swiftly with both of the reservists receiving reductions in their rank, said a spokesman for U.S. Southern Command.

Six complaints of abuse have been raised by prisoners at Guantanamo, said Raul Duany, a spokesman at Southern Command headquarters in Miami, which overseas the prison. He said three of the complaints were unsubstantiated and one involved a guard who was exonerated for using pepper spray on a prisoner.

Of the two cases that were resolved with disciplinary action against prison guards, one in April 2003 involved a reservist who hit a prisoner on the head with a radio to break up a fight between the prisoner and another guard, Mr. Duany said. The prisoner then bit the reservist, who in turn hit the prisoner again.

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Two Guantanamo Guards Punished for Prisoner Abuse
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