Joint Statement on Third Border Initiative

By Ereli, J. Adam | DISAM Journal, Winter 2003 | Go to article overview

Joint Statement on Third Border Initiative


Ereli, J. Adam, DISAM Journal


[The following is the text of the US/CARICOM/Dominican Republic joint statement on the Third Border Initiative, as released by the Department of State.]

January 12, 2004, Countries Vow to Work Together to Achieve Shared Goals

The Governments of the United States of America and of the Caribbean nations of Antigua and Barbuda, the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, the Commonwealth of Dominica, the Dominican Republic, Grenada, the Co-operative Republic of Guyana, the Republic of Haiti, Jamaica, the Federation of Saint Christopher and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, the Republic of Suriname, and the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago pledge to strengthen our cooperation in responding to global and hemispheric challenges in a spirit of partnership and mutual respect.

In pledging to work closely together in pursuit of shared goals, the countries paid tribute to the following:

   Our cultural ties, social and economic links, shared tradition of
   democracy, mutual respect for the sovereignty and territorial
   integrity of individual states, and out commitment to good
   governance, the rule of law, human rights, individual freedoms
   and open economies.

Their joint statement was released on the final day of the Special Summit of the Americas, held January 12-13 in Monterre, Mexico.

The countries welcome the Third Border Initiative by stating the following:

   As a valuable framework for structuring our engagement across the
   broad spectrum of matters that affect the prosperity as well-being
   of the region and its peoples. The Third Border Initiative
   recognizes the special significance of the Caribbean as an
   important partner of the United States and seeks to build on the
   long history of constructive engagement between the United States
   and the Caribbean.

   The Third Border Initiative aims to focus US and Caribbean
   engagement through targeted programs that comprise both new and
   ongoing activities designed to enhance cooperation in the
   diplomatic, security, economic, environmental, health and
   education arenas without prejudice to additional areas of
   collaboration that may be agreed upon in the future, it provides
   the opportunity to focus funding and assistance on those areas
   where we see the greatest increased need.

We recognize that our nations are bound together by our cultural ties, social and economic links, shared tradition of democracy, mutual respect for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of individual states, and our commitment to good governance, the rule of law, human rights, individual freedoms and open economies.

We therefore welcome the Third Border Initiative announced by President George W. Bush during the Third Summit of the Americas in Quebec City in April 2001, as a valuable framework for structuring our engagement across the broad spectrum of matters that affect the prosperity and well being of the region and its peoples. The Third Border Initiative, building on the Bridgetown Partnership for Prosperity and Security of May 1997, recognizes the special significance of the Caribbean as an important partner of the United States and seeks to build on the long history of constructive engagement between the United States and the Caribbean.

We are further bound by a determination to protect our region from terrorists and criminals who would destroy our way of life and by a belief that terrorist acts, such as the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11,2001, represent a serious threat to international peace and our hemispheric security and require our governments to continue efforts to prevent, combat, and eliminate terrorism. We recognize that threats to our security, concerns, and other challenges are diverse in nature and multidimensional in scope, and that traditional concepts and approaches must be expanded to encompass new and non-traditional threats, which include political, economic, social, health and environmental aspects. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Joint Statement on Third Border Initiative
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.