Banks Are Urged to Lobby Agencies Implementing Law

By Garsson, Robert M. | American Banker, December 10, 1991 | Go to article overview

Banks Are Urged to Lobby Agencies Implementing Law


Garsson, Robert M., American Banker


Banks Are Urged to Lobby Agencies Implementing Law

WASHINGTON -- Now that Congress has passed major banking legislation, all eyes are turning to the next battleground: the agencies that will issue regulations implementing the measure.

The banking act contains dozens of deadlines for new rules that bank and thrift supervisory agencies must meet. (See listing on page 17.)

For bankers and thrift executives, the process offers one last chance to influence how the changes take shape. Even though Congress wrote the 400-page bill, the agencies still have some leeway in drafting the regulations that will the implement it.

Some observers are urging banks to lobby their regulators early -- before they finish the first draft of the new rules.

Bankers in the past typically didn't join the fight until the regulations were put out for comment, said Karen Shaw, president of the Institute for Strategy Development. "By then, the scope of the regulation is pretty much set in stone and it's hard to change," she said.

Tall Orders

For regulators, the legislation's deadlines may prove next to impossible to meet. For example, the agencies that regulate banks and thrifts are given 18 months to implement a risk-based capital standard that includes interest rate risk.

"The only agency that's managed to do that so far is the Office of Thrift Supervision, and the industry pretty much blew that away," said Diane Casey, executive director of the Independent Bankers Association of America. The OTS withdrew its regulation this fall under industry pressure.

Moreover, Ms. Casey said, the last time the agencies grappled with risk-based capital standards it took years to come to agreement.

For those charged with interpreting the new law, the process is more difficult than usual, in no small part because of the haste with which it was thrown together during the final night of the congressional session. …

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