Assessment and Accountability: Strategies for Inquiry-Style Discussions

By Beto, Rachel A. | Teaching Children Mathematics, May 2004 | Go to article overview

Assessment and Accountability: Strategies for Inquiry-Style Discussions


Beto, Rachel A., Teaching Children Mathematics


Teachers' actions are what encourage students to think, question, solve problems, and discuss their ideas, strategies, and solutions. The teacher is responsible for creating an intellectual environment where serious mathematical thinking is the norm.

--Principles and Standards for School Mathematics (NCTM 2000, p. 18)

Teachers at my school recently watched a video of a model inquiry lesson, in which the instructor gathered her fifteen students on a rug to discuss fractions and share drawings and ideas. My neighbor whispered, "Sure, it's easy when you have just fifteen kids. Forget it! I've got thirty!" How does a teacher with a large class facilitate a mathematical discussion that produces important ideas, engages all students, and includes assessment? It may sound impossible, but many strategies can make inquiry-style discussions accessible to all teachers.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

As mathematics instruction shifts from direct instruction in which students memorize algorithms to inquiry-style instruction in which students discover properties of numbers, teachers must modify the classroom environment and assessments. Susan Jo Russell defines computational fluency as "efficiency, accuracy, and flexibility" (p. 154). A strong understanding of the base-ten number system helps children choose strategies that demonstrate computational fluency, which requires both basic skills (to assist problem solving) and conceptual awareness (to justify answers). When students work on problems alone, share strategies, then practice the new strategies, they build flexibility from seeing one problem solved in multiple ways; accuracy arises from using these strategies to verify answers and justify solutions. In order to create efficiency and flexibility, I alternate mathematical discussions with practice using a variety of problems and hands-on investigations.

One way to create rich discussions, both in small and large groups, is to post a problem on large paper and gather the students in front of the problem with papers, pencils, and something to write on. Without teaching an algorithm, the teacher asks students to solve the problem using their own strategies and prior knowledge. Then students share their work and confirm or debate one another's reasoning. The emphasis is on how each student arrived at the answer. The teacher's main question and comment are the following:

1. How do you know?

2. Please label your pictures with numbers.

Asking this question when students are correct as well as incorrect is important because mistakes are an integral aspect of inquiry-based discussions. Students gain number sense when they make, discover, and analyze mistakes. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate how a student's mistake can initiate discussion.

To make these mathematics discussions powerful opportunities for all students, teachers must foster a student-centered environment, make students accountable for participating, and take notes about student understanding. This article describes specific strategies that teachers can implement to create powerful participation and discusses how to assess students during mathematical discourse.

[FIGURE 3 OMITTED]

Setting the Scene

In inquiry-based instruction, students play the lead role while the teacher makes sure that students are listening to one another and building meaning from one another's work. Creating the discussion-centered classroom begins on the first day of school. Students must learn to pay attention to one another and be accountable for what others share with the class in all subjects.

The following three discussion "rules" provide a good base for the strategies discussed in this section:

1. Keep your eyes on the speaker.

2. Think about what others say.

3. Always be ready to explain another's ideas and/or offer your own.

Teachers should establish clear expectations that all students are aware of what has just been spoken and that students will ask questions when they do not hear or understand the speaker. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Assessment and Accountability: Strategies for Inquiry-Style Discussions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.