A Look at the Formation of Ted, the Leader

By Wilson, Lois M. | Anglican Journal, May 2004 | Go to article overview

A Look at the Formation of Ted, the Leader


Wilson, Lois M., Anglican Journal


ONE RECEIVES from this book a very clear picture of the priorities of Archbishop Ted Scott. His primary attention was always given to the person in immediate need. One of the best of many stories in the book is told by Suzanne Rumsey, daughter of the incumbent at Christ Church, Cranbrook, B.C. At age 14 and alone at home with her nine-year-old brother, her doorbell rang and there was the primate, Ted Scott, calling in to say hello to her parents. In response to Ted's inquiry as to how he was, the young boy said, "My fish tank isn't working." Soon they were calling him "Ted" and the fish tank got fixed.

This extraordinary attention to persons enabled Ted to humanize the staff relationships of the World Council of Churches; to be sensitive to the needs of outsiders in society such as aboriginal people in Canada and black South Africans and to refuse to label or demonize people who may have become polarized in a debate. In Radical Compassion, he is presented not as a radical, or a reformer, nor even a radical agent of change, but as one who works for renewal through consensus (sometimes to a fault), full collegiality with the bishops, and respect for the dignity of each person.

Thankfully, he is not presented as a plaster saint, even though committed to social justice and to the health of the church of Jesus Christ.

The book raises the question as to what the appropriate stance of the church is on issues of social justice. Is it confrontation or ongoing dialogue on tough issues such as apartheid in South Africa or aboriginal issues in Canada? It gives a harrowing account of the price Ted and the Canadian churches paid for supporting the World Council of Churches' Program to Combat Racism, as well as some inside glimpses of his work as moderator of that council. This work on the world stage paved the way for his appointment as one of the seven-member Eminent Persons Group set up in 1985 by the British Commonwealth to try to resolve the apartheid crisis in South Africa. This fascinating chapter marks the intense engagement of Ted Scott with one of the most critical issues the world had to face in his time.

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