Sports Fans, Get Ready for Ad-Nausea

By Freeman, Mike | The Florida Times Union, May 14, 2004 | Go to article overview

Sports Fans, Get Ready for Ad-Nausea


Freeman, Mike, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Mike Freeman, The Times-Union

Spider-Man spinning webs on the base path is just the beginning. We will one day pine for the time when there were just a handful of jockeys wearing ads on their jockeys. Because we are a nightmare away from the beginning of a new era in sports.

Not the steroid era.

Not the me-athlete era.

But the crass, obnoxious commercialism era, when every athlete, on every field of play, looks like a NASCAR driver, his uniform and body tattooed with endorsements, and between quarters or innings, it will be commonplace to see players do live ads for Ford or Pepsi or Burger King.

"Hi, I'm Peyton Manning, and if you want to make great passes like the one I just threw , try Viagra. Don't be a bore, go out and score!"

This isn't science fiction. This is the not-so-distant future. Cue the slippery slope. There was baseball's attempt to put the Spider-Man 2 movie logo on bases. Boxers have painted ads on their abs. Race jockeys have joined the human billboard club. The leap from Jeff Gordon's handsome mug being splashed with ads and Tim Duncan's extra long uniform sporting Starbucks logos no longer seems so grand.

Mike Tyson enters the ring. The camera pans to his broad lower back, where there is a tattoo that says, "1800Bailbondsman.com."

The reason for the sudden surge in uniform peddling, and for the bigger surge yet to come, is cash of course. Television money has been the lifeblood of sports franchises and once upon a time seemed unlimited, like oil in Saudi Arabia.

But the pockets of the networks are not so deep after all. Now, both franchises and players are seeking alternative revenue streams. It's no longer enough to make millions in profits or salaries. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sports Fans, Get Ready for Ad-Nausea
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.