U-46 to Shrink Some Classes Elementary Classrooms in At-Risk Schools Will Have Fewer Students

By Malone, Tara | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 19, 2004 | Go to article overview

U-46 to Shrink Some Classes Elementary Classrooms in At-Risk Schools Will Have Fewer Students


Malone, Tara, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Tara Malone Daily Herald Staff Writer

Taking what many parents call a step in the right direction, Elgin Area School District U-46 officials on Tuesday said they will limit how many children fill elementary classrooms.

In some schools.

Fifteen of the district's most academically endangered schools will cap kindergarten, first- and second-grade classes at 25 students, down from the current average of 30 kids.

Relief will come for six of the 15 schools where standardized test scores dipped low enough to land them on the state's academic watch list in 2002-2003. There, class size for third- through sixth-grade will be pegged at 28 students.

"I'm definitely more comfortable with the prospect of 25 students in my daughter's kindergarten class than 30," Coleman Elementary parent Sue Reynolds said. "It puts me a little more at ease."

Such relief did not extend to all corners of U-46.

The district's remaining 25 elementary schools will adhere to a 30-student class average, a limit U-46 administrators say they plan to strictly enforce.

Elementary schools slated to receive more than 30 students next fall will be afforded an extra teacher to fill a second classroom. But they will not see classes shrink to 25 or 28 children at any grade level.

That would be too costly, district officials say.

The two-punch effect of leveling classes at 30 kids and lowering class sizes in at-risk schools will cost $1.3 million, funds largely drawn from a $1 million federal grant typically reserved for teacher training. That will pay the salaries of 26 additional teachers.

If the district shaved classes by one student in all 40 elementary schools, bringing the average down to 29, it would cost $2.1 million, Chief Financial Officer John Prince said.

"We're taking a very cautious approach. We felt reallocating existing funds was less risky than assuming new dollars would materialize," Prince said.

Until extra dollars appear, U-46 officials say they will focus on schools where students face the greatest academic odds: poverty and a new language.

Parkwood Elementary is one such school.

Half of the 440 students at the Hanover Park school are new to English; Nearly 65 percent come from lower-income families. Low test scores last year required that Parkwood give parents the option of moving kids to a better-performing U-46 school. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U-46 to Shrink Some Classes Elementary Classrooms in At-Risk Schools Will Have Fewer Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.