Canada's Own Computers in Libraries Conference

By Wilson, Martin | Information Today, December 1991 | Go to article overview

Canada's Own Computers in Libraries Conference


Wilson, Martin, Information Today


Computers in Libraries Canada Conference (October 23-25, Metro Toronto Convention Centre) confirmed that this conference has established itself as the favored technology show with Canadian librarians and information specialists.

Canadian librarians and information specialists are at a par with their U.S. counterparts and consequently programming compaired with similar technology conferences in the U.S. But four of the 15 available tracks attracted the largest crowds: Computer Technology in Service to Schools; Technology for Special Libraries; CD-ROM: Selection, Integration and Use; and Electronic Networks and Libraries. The first three convened for an entire day; the last for four sessions.

Electronic Networks

Organized by Tom Eadie of Mount Allison University (Sackville, NB), this session brought together the editor of an E-journal (Charles Bailey of PACS-L, based at the University of Houston Libraries), a commercial publisher (Anthony Abbott of Meckler), an expert in network-based resources (Gord Nickerson, SLIS, University of Western Ontario), and a developer of Internet browsing software.

Bailey, speaking on Electronic Serials on International Computer Networks, emphasized the development of an important new method of scholarly communication that has emerged on international computer networks including BITNET and the Internet. According to Bailey, these "electronic serials hold great promise and they challenge many traditional notions rooted in our heritage of print serials."

In his presentation, Bailey alluded to the "many legal, social, and technical issues which need to be resolved before they will compete effectively with print serials."

In particular, Bailey described a number of new electronic journals. He noted that many are highly ambitious projects; some of these are formal refereed electronic journals. (Detailed information about many of them is found in a special issue of his own electronic journal, The Public-Access Comptuer Systems Review. It may be obtained electronically by sending an e-mail message containing the following command to the BITNET address UHUPVM1: GET CONTENTS PRV2N1.)

Commercial Publisher on the Internet

Anthony Abbott, Senior VP at Meckler Corp, described the history of the company's involvement in electronic provision of information. At this time, the company has launched the first files electronic information service that may be accessed through the Internet. This experimental service is "the first stage in an electronic document program intended to encompass a full range of networked publishing concepts. …

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Canada's Own Computers in Libraries Conference
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