Politics; There Is a Bull Market in Jack Straw Shares: The Foreign Secretary Has Become a Political Force. Will He Be a Good Deputy When Gordon Brown Is PM? or Even More?

By Kampfner, John | New Statesman (1996), May 3, 2004 | Go to article overview

Politics; There Is a Bull Market in Jack Straw Shares: The Foreign Secretary Has Become a Political Force. Will He Be a Good Deputy When Gordon Brown Is PM? or Even More?


Kampfner, John, New Statesman (1996)


At his cabinet meeting on 22 April, Tony Blair apologised briefly for his handling of the U-turn on the European constitution. Then he paused, and added that he would prefer to confide in his senior colleagues without them later briefing the media. Every one knew who he had in mind.

Blair is feeling sore towards Jack Straw. He accepted the Foreign Secretary's argument about the need to change policy on the constitutional referendum, but, as one of the Prime Minister's aides put it: "Jack has not been shy about trying to take the credit for it."

Straw has become a political force to be reckoned with. The transformation has been sudden. He was promoted to the Foreign Office--to his and everyone's surprise--after the June 2001 election, with the sole purpose of executing the Prime Minister's will. After Robin Cook's tenure, Blair wanted fewer fireworks with Gordon Brown, especially over Europe. It was hoped that Straw would be a safe pair of hands.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The top mandarins in King Charles Street were resigned to seeing the Foreign Secretary having to walk across the road to Downing Street for meetings with Sir David Manning, Blair's foreign policy chief, and not the other way round. Straw did not appear too resentful. After all, that was how things were done.

As he found his feet, so he began to stake out his own positions. The list of differences with Blair is long and significant. On the EU, Straw coined for himself the description "practical European"--not for him the high rhetoric on integration. On Israel and the Middle East, he has differed sharply, preferring a far less accommodating approach to Ariel Sharon. On the US, in his almost daily phone calls to his counterpart, Colin Powell, he has lamented the direction of Bush's policies in a way Blair and his people would not dare.

On Iraq, Straw has never been comfortable. He watched helplessly as Blair and Bush secretly agreed their agenda for war early in 2002. The failure to secure a second UN resolution caused him no little soul searching. His last-minute note to Blair on the eve of war, suggesting that UK forces not be sent into combat, came as no surprise to those in the know at the top in Downing Street and the Foreign Office.

Blair peremptorily dismissed Straw's concerns, giving him a choice--either to quit or to fall in behind. He chose the latter. Even then, he was unhappy about the lack of postwar planning for Iraq.

Last July, Straw briefed the BBC that weapons of mass destruction would probably not be found--a full six months before Blair was forced to admit the same.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Politics; There Is a Bull Market in Jack Straw Shares: The Foreign Secretary Has Become a Political Force. Will He Be a Good Deputy When Gordon Brown Is PM? or Even More?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.