South African Zulu Opera Opens Ravinia's 100th Season

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 21, 2004 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

South African Zulu Opera Opens Ravinia's 100th Season


Byline: Bill Gowen

A very special event awaits music lovers when the Ravinia Festival officially opens its gates for the centennial 2004 season the weekend of June 4-6.

Following Ravinia's recent commitment to such ground-breaking theater pieces as Osvaldo Golijov's "La Pasion Segun San Marcos" in 2002 and American composer John Adams' "El Nino" last season, this year's festival will open with the American premiere of the first South African Zulu opera, "Princess Magogo kaDinuzulu."

One week before the three performances, Ravinia will bring in 70 performers and a technical crew from South Africa to help stage this truly international event, which, in addition to launching Ravinia Park's 100th season, will celebrate the 10th anniversary of democracy in South Africa.

Ravinia president and CEO Welz Kauffman and his staff have been working closely with many Chicago-area arts and educational institutions in this latest installment of the festival's multicultural artistic initiative.

"Princess Magogo," which combines traditional Western classical music with indigenous Zulu art forms, is the centerpiece of numerous community outreach and education activities throughout the Chicago area.

Composer Mzilikazi Khumalo and librettist Themba Msimang based their opera (which was premiered in Durban, South Africa, in 2002) on the life of the popular Zulu princess of the title, who was herself a singer.

The part will be played by internationally renowned mezzo- soprano Sibongile Khumalo, who originated the role in Durban. She will also perform a Martin Theatre recital with the Ramsey Lewis Trio June 9.

Providing the musical accompaniment for "Princess Magogo" will be the Chicago Sinfonietta, itself a leader in the area's multicultural performing arts scene.

In a related event set for June 15-16, Ravinia will present two performances by the South African vocal group Ladysmith Black Mambazo, popularized in the United States through Paul Simon's "Graceland" album.

The group will be joined by the Chicago Children's Choir.

Area arts and education organizations involved as partners in the "Princess Magogo" celebration week include Chicago's Department of Cultural Affairs, Joffrey Ballet and the Muntu Dance Theatre of Chicago.

They will participate in events aimed at sharing American culture with the visiting artists. Columbia College's Center for Black Music Research is also collaborating with Ravinia by distributing related educational materials.

Here's a brief summary of events related to the "Princess Magogo" celebration:

Thursday 27: At 10:30 a.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

South African Zulu Opera Opens Ravinia's 100th Season
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?