Students Use Poetry to Express Viewpoints

By Stuttley, Henry | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 26, 2004 | Go to article overview

Students Use Poetry to Express Viewpoints


Stuttley, Henry, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Henry Stuttley Daily Herald Staff Writer

Willowbrook High School students are learning to speak their minds.

"You're just a robot programmed to teach," junior Nicky Borge said as she recited her poem "Metal and Wire" in front of students. "I want to be taught by a person with real feelings and real emotions, not an android whose only purpose is to upload information into you."

Junior Kate Comrad expressed her dislike for President Bush.

She said she was inspired to write her poem after students began talking about the war in Iraq in one of her classes.

"How about you fight this war Mr. President? I don't see you in the ring," she said. "Unfortunately we elected you Bush, so in this boxing match we would lose."

From dating to politics, students expressed their feelings on a number of issues during a recent poetry slam workshop at the Villa Park high school.

Lewis University professor George Miller entertained about 100 students with his energetic poetry on myriad of issues, employing antics such as standing upside down on a table.

After Miller's performance, the students began writing poetry in small groups. They shared their poems during a mock poetry slam while their peers were the judges.

"The last couple of years, I've tried to find some new and interesting ways to get students interested and involved in poetry," English teacher Kristin Allen said. …

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