A Cautious Go-Ahead for Globalization

By Bowman, Karlyn | The American Enterprise, June 2004 | Go to article overview

A Cautious Go-Ahead for Globalization


Bowman, Karlyn, The American Enterprise


Americans believe that globalization is mostly good for the U.S., but they are divided about whether it will help them and their families. Only about 10 percent want to try to stop or reverse it. The largest number, 40 percent, are content to allow it to continue. People are aware that globalization may mean less security for American workers. They recognize that workers in other countries will work for lower wages and that American consumers want the lowest possible prices.

People around the world recognize that global trade, communications, and cultural ties are increasing, and substantial majorities think that this is a good thing for their countries and for them and their families. The results are especially impressive, because in many of the countries surveyed people thought that the availability of good-paying jobs in their countries had gotten worse over the past five years.

People around the world are enthusiastic about the rapid spread of popular culture (movies, television shows, and music) around the globe. They believe that English will be the language of the new global economic order. In Canada, Great Britain, France and Germany substantial majorities are already travelling beyond their own country's borders.

Question: Do you believe ...?

Globalization, especially the Increasing connections of our Economy
with others around the World, is mostly good for the U.S.

Good         56%
Not sure      9%
Neutral       8%
Mostly Bad   27%

Source: Harris Interactive for the Chicago Council on
Foreign Relations and the German Marshall Fund,
June 2002.

Note: Table made from pie graph.

Question: Do you think ...?

A global economy will probably help the financial
situation of me and my family in the future

Me                36%
Definitely help    4%
Don't know        20%
Definitely hurt   11%
Probably hurt     29%

Source: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press,
January 2003.

Note: Table made from pie graph.

Question: Overall, with regard to further globalization, do you think ...?

The United State should actively promote globalization

Actively promote                         19%
No answer                                 4%
Try to stop it or reverse it              9%
Try to slow it down                      29%
Simply allow globalization to continue   40%

Source: Knowledge Networks for the Program for International
Policy Attitudes, December 2003-January 2004.

Note: Table made from pie graph.

Question: Overall, do you think ...?

Globalization is a good thing for ...

                                             Bad
                                             thing
Providing jobs and strengthening the   64%    21%
economy in poor countries

Democracy and human rights abroad      61     20

Consumers like you                     55     27

American companies                     55     30

Maintaining cultural                   53     28
diversity in the world

The U.S. economy                       52     20

Your own standard of living            51     28

Creating jobs in the U.S.              43     41

The environment                        42     37

Job security for American workers      32     51

Source: Harris Interactive for the Chicago Council on
Foreign Relations and the German Marshall Fund,
June 2002.

Note: Table made from bar graph.

Question: As I mention some possible reasons for the loss of American jobs to foreign competitors, please tell me if you think each is a ...

The reason

                                          Minor    Not a
                                          reason   reason

People in other countries are       80%     11%       5%
willing to work for lower pay

Investors and CEOs want profits     77      13        4
and don't care where they come
from

Other countries have lower          61      20       11
anvironmental and worker health
standards

Consumers in this country want      56      28       11
everything at the lowest possible
price

Weak corporate leadership here      42      28       20

Labor unions here have too much     35      32       27
power

Source: Pricenton Survey Research Associates for Newsweek,
February 2004. 

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