Flotilla Sailing around the Greek Islands

Sunset, January 1992 | Go to article overview

Flotilla Sailing around the Greek Islands


FLOTILLA SAILING LETS YOU pilot your own boat in unfamiliar waters with the assurance that a well-seasoned skipper and engineer are sailing nearby. It's an adventurous but relaxed way to travel around the Greek islands, the most popular spot for this kind of sailing. Trips generally last two weeks, including travel from the U.S. or a European city.

On some trips, boats sail together continuously. On others, you may break off for a while, then regroup.

Are you a fledgling skipper? Some trips are geared to beginners: you learn skills while bunking ashore for several days, then set sail. To skipper a boat owned by other outfitters, you need to be a competent sailor--at least in a similar craft.

Sailing groups generally consist of at least four people per boat, unless you pay a supplement. You can cook simple meals in your galley or dine ashore. All the boats are equipped with engines and radios.

You're under way from 3 to 6 hours a day, covering 10 to 30 miles. Though such wind-borne passage may sound idyllic, it isn't always: you might be becalmed and have to motor, it might rain, and food in island restaurants might not always be delicious or promptly served.

Sailing costs $50 to $220 a day per person, depending on dates and type of craft. Prices do not include air fare or food. The season is May through mid-October. The four companies we list have U.S. agents.

Falcon. Sails 12 boats off the Peloponnese, in the Ionian Sea and Saronic Gulf. Villa-Flotilla combines shore training with a week of sailing. Departures twice a week. Fly from London. Write to Si Smith Sailing in Greece, Box 11510, Aspen, Colo. 81612, or call (303) 925-8181.

G.P.S.C. Sails 6 to 10 boats around the Cyclades or Saronic islands. No instruction. Monthly departures, May through October. Frly from New York. Write to 600 St. Andrews Rd., Philadelphia 19118, or call (800) 732-6786.

Moorings. Sails 18 boats. One trip at the end of September. No instruction. Fly from New York. Sail the Saronic Gulf side of the Peloponnese. Write to 19345 U.S. Highway 19N, #402, Clearwater, Fla. 34624, or call (813) 535-1446 or (800) 535-7289.

Sunsail. Uses from 6 to 12 boats in Saronic Gulf and Ionian Sea, or around Dodecanese and Sporades. Five departures every week. Fly from either London or Manchester. Write to 2 Prospect Park, 3347 N.W. 55th St., Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33309, or call (305) 484-5246 or (800) 327-2276 (reservations).

CHILE

GLACIERS AND FIORDS

Departing Miami on February 27, a 14-day Chilean journey begins with several days of exploring Santiago. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Flotilla Sailing around the Greek Islands
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.