Books Received


Absence and Light: Meditations from the Klamath Marshes, by John R. Campbell. University of Nevada Press/ 142pp./$21.95 (sb).

Anne Arden McDonald: Installations and Self Portraits, by Anne Arden McDonald. Autonomy and Alchemy Press/100pp./$60.00 (hb).

The Art of the Flower, Hans-Michael Herzog, editor. Stemmle AG Editions (Switzerland) & Kunsthalle Bielefeld (Germany) publishers/143pp./$55.00

Art Theory: An Historical Introduction, by Robert Williams. Blackwell Publishng/310pp./$29.95 (sb).

Artist's Color Manual: the Complete Guide to Working with Color, by Simon Jennings. Chronicle Books/192pp./$27.50 (sb).

AsianAmerican.net: Ethnicity, Nationalism and Cyberspace, Rachel C. Lee and Sau-ling Cynthia Wong, editors. Routledge/316pp./$24.95 (sb).

Bernard F. Eilers 1878-1951, Flip Bool et al., editors. Focus Publishing/288pp./$65 (hb).

Between Cultures: Children of Immigrants in America, by Gina Grillo. The University of Chicago Press/120pp./$29.95 (hb).

Breaking Records: 100 Years of Hits, by William Ruhlmann. Routledge/288pp./$27.95 (hb).

Bush League Diplomacy: How the Neoconservatives Are Putting the World at Risk, Craig R. Eisendrath and Melvin A. Goodman. Prometheus Books/268pp./$26 (hb).

California Dreamin': Camera Clubs and the Pictorial Photography Tradition, by Stacey McCarrol. Boston University Art Gallery & University of Washington Press/96pp./$30 (sb).

Casualty of War: The Bush Administration's Assault on a Free Press, by David Dodge. Prometheus Books/350pp./$26 (hb).

Chinese Films in Focus: 25 New Takes, Chris Berry, editor. California Princeton Fullfilment Services/224pp./$70 (hb), $24.95 (sb).

Chronophobia: On Time in the Art of the 1960s, by Pamela M. Lee. The MIT Press/394pp./$34.95 (hb)

Clement Greenberg: A Life, by Florence Rubenfeld. University of Minnesota Press/336pp./$$18.95 (sb).

The Consumption Reader, David B. Clarke, Marcus A. DoelG Kate M.L. Housiaux, editors. Routledge Press/288pp./$29.95 (sb).

Creative Canine Photography, by Larry Allan. Allworth Press/144pp./$$24.95 (sb).

Cuban Cinema, by Michael Chanan. University of Minnnesota Press/539pp./$25.95 (sb).

Cult Television, Sara Gwenllian-Jones and Roberta E. Pearson, editors. University of Minnesota Press/272pp./$68.95(hb), $22.95 (sb).

Escape, by David Levine. Forum Gallery/43pp./

Devotional Cinema, by Nathaniel Doesky. Tuumba Press/56pp./$10 (sb).

Digital Photography: Expert Techniques, by Ken Milburn. O'Reilly & Associates/ 469pp./$44.95 (sb).

The Digital Sublime: Myth, Power, and Cyberspace, by Vincent Mosco. The MIT Press/218pp./$27.95 (hb).

Duane Hanson Photographs 1977-1995, Laurence G. Miller, editor. Laurence Miller Gallery/44pp./$35 (sb).

An Eye for Hitchcock, by Murray Pomerance. Rutgers University Press/304pp./$62 (hb), $22.95 9 (sb).

The Eye of War: Words and Photographs from the Front Line, by Phillip Knightly. Smithsonian Books/287pp./$39.95 (hb).

The Fat Baby: Fifteen Stories On Social Issues, by Eugene Richards. Phaidon Press/432pp./$95 (hb).

The Films of Nicholas Ray, by Geoff Andrew. California Princeton Fulfillment Services/BFI Publishing/$70 (hb), $21.95 (sb).

Film Art Phenomena, by Nicky Hamlyn. California Princeton Fulfillment Services/208pp./$65 (hb), $24.95 (sb).

First Person: New Media as Story, Performance, and Game, Noah Wardrip-Fruin and Pat Harrigan, editors. The MIT Press/331pp./$39.95 (hb).

Frozen History: the Legacy of Scott and Shackleton, photographs by Josef & Katharina Hoflehner, text by David 1. Harrowfield. Josef Hoflehner, publisher (Austria)/288pp./$75.00

Ghouls, Gimmicks and Gold: Horror Films and the American Movie Business, 1953-1968, by Kevin Heffernan. Duke University Press/323 pp./$ 22.

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