ASEAN Energy Chiefs Seek Alternative Oil Sources

Manila Bulletin, June 10, 2004 | Go to article overview

ASEAN Energy Chiefs Seek Alternative Oil Sources


Byline: GENALYN D. KABILING

Even as they welcomed the decision of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) to boost its oil production, energy ministers from Southeast Asia yesterday agreed to look in their own backyard for alternative sources of oil to lessen reliance on costly imported crude.

The agreement was reached during a luncheon hosted by President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo for the visiting energy ministers of the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), and the trade ministers of China, Japan, and Korea in Malacanang.

We would continue to have our dialogue with our producers from outside the region but in general we decided that we need to integrate more closely with each other by tapping our very own resources whether it be oil, natural gas, coal as well as renewable energy, Energy Secretary Vicente Perez said in a press briefing.

The visiting officials are in Manila for the 22nd ASEAN Ministers on Energy Meeting (AMEM) and the first meeting of the AMEM +3 that includes the trade ministers of China, Japan, and Korea.

Perez was the chairman of the 22nd AMEM. He was addressing energy senior officials from 20 countries attending the event in Makati.

Perez said the President cited the ASEAN +3 meeting in Manila as most timely considering that the price of oil has been volatile and energy security is a paramount concern to sustain the economic growth in the region.

He said the energy ministers also agreed to review and update the ASEAN Petroleum Supply agreement signed in 1986 to be more responsive to the oil needs of the members.

He said the agreement stipulates that an ASEAN member, if in distress, could rely on its neighboring countries for oil supply.

Perez said the President led a lively discussion with ASEAN energy ministers on the diversification of oil

resources as well as the use of alternative fuel such as compressed natural gas for public transport and

forms of bio-diesel to reduce the regions dependence on imported petroleum whose supply and price have been

controlled by OPEC.

He said the President suggested the use of coconut oil for biodiesel, which is a first for the Philippines,

to the visiting ASEAN energy ministers. In most countries, biodiesel is a mixture of diesel fuel and ester derived either from corn, soya, rapeseed or palm.

According to Perez, the ASEAN members are starting to buy oil from fellow Asian countries like Malaysia, Indonesia, Australia, and Russia.

The ASEAN energy ministers are also hammering out plans for a regional gas network to increase energy security for the region, he said.

Indonesia, with Asias biggest proven gas reserves of natural gas, has proposed a pipeline running from East Kalimantan to Sabah in Malaysia and then to the Philippines. It would join a network of other proposed pipelines to link supply and demand centers in the ASEAN.

Perez, meanwhile, welcomed as a positive sign the decision of OPEC to increase their oil production from 23.5 million barrels to 25 million barrels to keep the prices of oil stable.

Were very glad that OPEC in the last extraordinary meeting that they had listened to the call of consuming countries, he said.

The security of energy supplies has become a priority for Asia as strong economic growth increases the regions reliance on imported crude, most noticeably from the oil-rich but volatile Middle East.

The ASEAN group has been lobbying before OPEC to increase production of oil and lower the prices for its member-nations.

On the domestic front, Perez expressed hope that local oil companies would continue to offer and if possible expand outlets offering discounted diesel products to the public transport sector.

He admitted though the government cannot force the private-owned oil companies to continue with the practice since this is a free market.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

ASEAN Energy Chiefs Seek Alternative Oil Sources
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.