More Data Link PTSD, Cardiovascular Disease

By Tucker, Miriam E. | Clinical Psychiatry News, May 2004 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

More Data Link PTSD, Cardiovascular Disease


Tucker, Miriam E., Clinical Psychiatry News


ORLANDO, FLA. -- The cumulative evidence connecting psychological trauma with cardiovascular disease is becoming increasingly convincing. Joseph A. Boscarino, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society.

Dr. Boscarino, a senior scientist at the New York Academy of Medicine, reviewed existing literature and presented his latest findings from an ongoing study of Vietnam veterans. Overall, the data point to links between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and cardiovascular symptomatology, disease, and mortality.

"There are very few negative studies. It all goes in one direction," he said.

At least 13 published population-based and clinical studies involving 50,000 subjects have investigated the relationship between traumatic events and subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Among them are Dr. Boscarino's own study of more than 4,000 Vietnam veterans 20 years after the war, in which those who had PTSD had increased rates of atrioventricular conduction defects, even after controlling for multiple confounders (Ann. Behav. Med. 21[3]:227-34, 1999).

Other data regarding war and battle trauma include increased rates of arteriographic abnormalities among those exposed to traumatic events during Beirut's civil war, increased rates of physician-diagnosed arterial disease in veterans of World War II and the Korean War, and increases in angina pectoris among Dutch resistance veterans.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

More Data Link PTSD, Cardiovascular Disease
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?