Researching Economic and Labor Market Issues, Trends, and Developments

Business Perspectives, Fall 1991 | Go to article overview

Researching Economic and Labor Market Issues, Trends, and Developments


When Memphis or Shelby County governments wanted to know the economic impact the Pyramid or an NFL team or horse racing would have on the community, they enlisted the research expertise of the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at Memphis State University.

When the Memphis Area Chamber of Commerce or businesses in or outside Memphis want to know what's happening in the local economy, they, too, call the BBER, the largest applied research bureau at MSU and one of the largest of its kind in the country.

Established in 1963, the Bureau's 33-member staff also works with many of the state's governmental divisions such as the Tennessee Departments of Education, Labor, Human Services, and Employment Security.

In addition to conducting economic-impact studies, following economic indicators, analyzing market trends, and providing revenue forecasts for city and state governments, the BBER routinely responds to information requests from outside agencies, according to Dr. John Gnuschke, director of the BBER and the Center for Manpower Studies (CMS).The Bureau receives an estimated 90 calls for information per month.

The BBER's continual public service commitment to the community has included such activities as censuses of newly annexed areas of Memphis, a new business tax study, and a study of Shelby Farms.

To keep the public informed, the BBER publishes the Memphis Economy newsletter and Business Perspectives magazine, both of which are free to subscribers. The monthly newsletter follows economic trends by providing analyses and data about various economic indicators. Each issue of the quarterly-published Business Perspectives focuses on a current business or economic topic. Articles are practical rather than academic in nature and are written by Fogelman College of Business and Economics faculty and business professionals outside MSU.

Since 1963, the Bureau has been an active member of the Association for University Business and Economic Research (AUBER), a professional association of business and economic research organizations in American public and private universities. …

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Researching Economic and Labor Market Issues, Trends, and Developments
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