Maurice Hinson Endowment Fund

American Music Teacher, June-July 2004 | Go to article overview

Maurice Hinson Endowment Fund


MTNA is pleased to announce the establishment of the Maurice Hinson Endowment Fund. Initiated by the members of the Kentucky MTA, many colleagues, friends and students contributed to the MTNA FOUNDATION FUND to recognize the achievements of Hinson throughout his long career in the music profession. This perpetual endowment fund will support MTNA programs and awards, including Teacher Enrichment Grants.

Maurice Hinson is one of America's most respected authorities on piano literature and the teaching of music to students at all levels. Among his outstanding achievements are the MTNA Lifetime Achievement Award, the outstanding Alumni Award from the University of Florida and the Citation of Merit Award from the University of Michigan School of Music Alumni Society. As an active member of the American Liszt Society, he was awarded its Medal of Excellence for identifying the lost Liszt Concerto in the Hungarian Style. He also was the recipient of the Liszt Commemorative Medal by the Hungarian Government and the Liszt Medal of the Hungarian Liszt Society.

Hailed as a specialist in American piano music, Hinson has authored articles for The New Grove Dictionary of American Music, American Music Teacher. Piano Quarterly, Clavier, the English Liszt Society and Quarterly Music Magazine of New South Wales, Australia. Among the books he has authored are The Pianist's Dictionary, Guide to the Pianist's Repertoire, The Pianist's Bookshelf, An Annotated Guide to Music for Piano and orchestra. The Pianists' Guide to Transcriptions, Arrangements and Paraphrases, An Annotated Guide to Music For More than one Piano and An Annotated Guide to the Piano in Chamber Ensemble.

Hinson received a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Florida and master of music and doctor of musical arts degrees from the University of Michigan. He also studied at The Sherwood Music School, The Juilliard School and the Conservatoire National at the University of Nancy in France. He has presented recitals, lectures and master classes on five continents and across the United States.

As senior professor of piano in the School of Church Music at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, Hinson teaches piano, piano literature and piano chamber music. He is a member of the Greater Louisville MTA and the Kentucky MTA. He is a past president of the MTNA Southern Division and served as editor of articles and reviews for American Music Teacher.

MTNA FOUNDATION FUND Contributors

This list includes individuals, associations, organizations and corporations who contributed to the

MTNA FOUNDATION FUND during the period from January 1-March 31, 2004.

Baldwin Piano Company

Warner Bros. Publications

Yamaha Corporation of America

Dickinson State University, North Dakota

Arizona Study Program

Austin District MTA

Central Arkansas MTA

Gwinnett County MTA

Illinois State MTA

Kansas MTA

Lafayette Piano Teachers Association

Main Line MTA

Maine MTA

Missouri MTA

New Orleans MTA

oregon MTA

Pikes Peak MTA

Reading MTA

San Angelo MTA

Texas MTA

Thursday Morning Music Club

Utah MTA

Melody Allen

Holly B. Altenderfer

Mark Baron

Bernard H. Baskin

Jane S. Bastien

Mary Louise Beckstrand

Rita Bee

Diana J. Belka

Digby Bell

Marge Bengel

Ronald Bennett

Dorinne Bilger

Lezlee Bishop

Jan Bordeleau

Paul Bordeleau

Marguerite Bowden

Joan W. Brinton

Jan J. Bryner

Rett Burge

Kathie Burtenshaw

Barbara Buttrey

Sharon T. Callahan

Geri A. Cheney

Selina Chu

Patricia Clark

Sylvia Coats

Susan Conner

Ann K.

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