Only Way to Have a Voice in World

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), June 19, 2004 | Go to article overview

Only Way to Have a Voice in World


Byline: By ELUNED MORGAN Western Mail

Recently re-elected MEP Eluned Morgan explains why she thinks we should support the new EU constitution A LOT of criticism was attached to the statement that the European Constitutional Treaty represented something of a 'tidying up exercise', but in many ways that description is spot on.

The European Union has several rule books which are, quite frankly, a bit of a mess. These rule books are a set of overlapping Treaties signed by the UK Government over the last 30 years, so it makes sense to unify the rules in a single document.

The most radical of these rule books, which rightly gave away our right of veto on issues to do with the single market so as to make EU trade easier - was signed by Margaret Thatcher.

The argument that only countries have constitutions and that we are effectively signing up to a 'country called Europe' was used by the 'no' campaign 30 years ago, and it had as much validity then as it does now - none.

Clubs of all kinds have constitutions, we are in a European club, and we should have a European constitution.

With UKIP gaining significant numbers of votes, it is clear for all to see that the Conservatives have reaped the whirlwind they created.

The Tories claimed the EU constitution would mean the Queen would be replaced as our head of state. It simply isn't true. The EU has no power over the structure of any member state's system of government. But the new constitution will allow Parliaments and regional bodies like the National Assembly to assess and influence EU legislation prior to its adoption.

Trial by jury is not under threat either. The constitution makes it clear that any proposal regarding legal systems takes into account the 'fundamental principles' of each country's own legal system.

Likewise, we will not lose control of our borders or our immigration policy. It is still up to the UK government who can come into the country.

However, we will obviously work with our European partners where it makes sense to do so - asylum and immigration are by their very nature international issues, requiring international co-operation.

Those who want to see us out of the EU argue that countries like Norway and Switzerland do OK outside the club. They do OK, but at what price?

To maintain their trading links with EU members, both Switzerland and Norway have to sign up to laws and regulations which their politicians will never get a say on. In Norway they call it 'fax democracy' - because their new laws arrive by fax from Brussels. How's that for sovereignty?

To have an argument about sovereignty now simply misses the point - we had that argument in 1973 and again in 1992. For the European Union to work at all, it is essential that we pool sovereignty on key issues on which we agree. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Only Way to Have a Voice in World
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.