Incentives to Attract More Teachers to Mathematics

The Journal (Newcastle, England), June 29, 2004 | Go to article overview

Incentives to Attract More Teachers to Mathematics


Potential maths teachers will be offered a host of new incentives in a bid to head off a recruitment crisis in the subject.

Education Secretary Charles Clarke yesterday unveiled plans to lift the salary cap for maths teachers, so that the best-performing and most highly-qualified could earn as much as pounds 60,000.

For advanced skills teachers in maths ( the so-called "super teachers" who use their experience to help other teachers in their subject ( it could mean a minimum salary of pounds 40,000.

And Government bursaries for teacher-training in subjects affected by staff shortages will be increased from pounds 1,000 to pounds 7,000 for maths.

Mr Clarke said: "We need to get away from the myth that mathematics is a stand- alone subject which is too difficult for many.

"Mathematical skills are crucial throughout the curriculum, from geography to ICT, and they are vital for today's fast-moving, hi-tech economy.

"The key issue is to raise the profile and esteem of mathematics. …

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