Risk Factors Lead to Heart Disease; Measures Cited

Manila Bulletin, July 5, 2004 | Go to article overview

Risk Factors Lead to Heart Disease; Measures Cited


Syndrome X, now considered an alarming health issue, is actually a combination of risk factors, including insulin resistance, elevated cholesterol or triglycerides, obesity, and high blood pressure.

The presence of three or more of these risk factors make a person a likely candidate for Syndrome X. this collection of several disorders can increase the risk for diabetes and the development of more severe cardiovascular diseases, like heart disease.

Many researchers show that heart disease begins early in life as a result of nutrient deficiencies, specifically a high fat diet. When a person eats too much energy-dense food while leading a sedentary or inactive lifestyle, he or she is likely to develop obesity, which is associated with Syndrome X. Similar to the domino effect, this can eventually lead to heart disease.

Dr. Gerald Reaven of the Stanford University School of Medicine, author of the book Syndrome X (2000) and of several related studies, has identified several signs of this condition. According to Reaven, patients whose fasting glucose is over 110, fasting triglycerides are over 200, fasting high density lipoprotein (HDL) is under 35, with a blood pressure above 145/90 should immediately see a physician familiar with Syndrome X to help them manage the condition and prevent further complications.

In other words, treating Syndrome X can prevent the onset of heart disease. …

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Risk Factors Lead to Heart Disease; Measures Cited
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