TIME OFF: TRAVEL: History at Your Feet; Janet Tansley Joins in on the New Guided Walking Tours That Bring Liverpool's Past Back to Life

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), July 6, 2004 | Go to article overview

TIME OFF: TRAVEL: History at Your Feet; Janet Tansley Joins in on the New Guided Walking Tours That Bring Liverpool's Past Back to Life


Byline: Janet Tansley

HAVE you ever fancied walking in the footsteps of Jack the Ripper, or rocking and rolling through this city's musical history?

Then the new series of summer walks currently being run by the council is just what you have been waiting for. It is hoped they will shine a new light on the city's influence on European and world culture.

For the first time ever, Liverpool council has employed the blue badge guides to deliver a fully detailed programme of walks which focus on Liverpool's greatest achievements and claims to fame.

Eight cultural walks focus on themes such as Literary Liverpool, Maritime, Mercantile City, Walks of Fame and Faith in One City.

And, for the brave, there is also a Liverpool Murder Trail, which tries to unveil the identity of Jack The Ripper, believed to be Liverpool businessman James Maybrick.

Organised by Liverpool city council's tourism and heritage unit, plans are afoot to roll out the walks throughout the year.

Councillor Warren Bradley, executive member for leisure and culture, says: ``Around every corner in Liverpool lurks a story to be told.

``Because of our unique place as a world port, they are always in the main a fascinating insight into British, European and world history from the demise of slavery to the rise of pop culture.

``There is so much about the history of Liverpool that we could walk and talk for years -- and that is exactly what we plan to do. ''

The first Summer City walk to take place was an On The Waterfront Tour which looked at Liverpool's literary heritage. It went from the Pier Head visiting Stanley Dock before ending at Liverpool Town Hall -- but don't worry, you'venot missed the boat yet.

The programme for the walks is as follows: Literary Liverpool -- On the Waterfront and Poets corner Discover the poetry, plays and prose that have put Liverpool on the literary map amongst elegant Victorian architecture and the world famous waterfront.

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TIME OFF: TRAVEL: History at Your Feet; Janet Tansley Joins in on the New Guided Walking Tours That Bring Liverpool's Past Back to Life
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