Lost Prophets Singer: He's Cool - Honestly

By Peralta, Eyder | The Florida Times Union, July 16, 2004 | Go to article overview

Lost Prophets Singer: He's Cool - Honestly


Peralta, Eyder, The Florida Times Union


Byline: EYDER PERALTA, The Times-Union

Ian Watkins is the lead singer of the newly successful Lost Prophets, a Welsh band that mixes in pop sensibilities with the hardest of rock, and he has two huge guns tattooed on his lower torso, pointed to places that would put a man in a terrible predicament were they real.

But he's cool, because there's none of that rock 'n' roll attitude. He doesn't mope around because he's been touring for the past three years and hasn't seen his home in five months. After all, the Prophets' song Last Train Home hit No. 1 on the modern rock charts.

"I always used to worry about not doing anything in my life," he said. "To wake up every day in a different city is wonderful. One minute we're in Paris, another we're in Venice. I mean, it can get tiring, but no more than a -- -- doctor. Being in a band is not work, and anybody who says it is is an -- --. You work for an hour a night: What the -- -- do you have to be exhausted about? You're exhausted by talking about your -- -- self? I guess coming from a real working class family, we know what hard work is."

That's Watkins. He naturally lets loose with profanity, like Colin Farrell, except with a Welsh accent. It's not for effect; it's who he is. Thirty minutes on the phone and he'd already ruled out being mobbed walking on the streets of his hometown in Wales. "Aerosmith could walk around and no one would give a -- --."

He'd given props to fellow Welshman Tom Jones and had said the Prophets' hard rock sound came about because it's easy to shred on an electric guitar.

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