'Higher Wisdom' in Education and Governance; Educators Speak

Manila Bulletin, July 25, 2004 | Go to article overview

'Higher Wisdom' in Education and Governance; Educators Speak


Byline: Dr. Dolores B. Lasan

HIGHER wisdom extends the conventional view of wisdom one step further. It is beyond that wisdom which human beings are expected to achieve upon coming of age. The essence of higher wisdom emanates from a state of being which is able to extend humanly attained wisdom to create a space for that which is beyond human potentials and capacities to achieve.

A space to realize that there is an element beyond even the full range of human wisdom developed in the context of logic and technology; that there is some kind of wisdom beyond the grasp of human beings. It is that quality of wisdom which further dignifies the conventional view of wisdom without detracting from what it is, "higher wisdom."

"Higher wisdom" exudes from the wisdom of human beings to see beyond their capacities to make sense about their business of existence as they propel their courses of action towards what their human wisdom contrives under given circumstances. For certain, it is within the realm of conventional wisdom to attain "higher wisdom" when the human beings begin to realize and believe in their capacities to understand the unknown, the uncertain, the unpredictable, and the unseen nature of being.

Being and beyond is the essence of "higher wisdom." It almost takes a lifetime to be human in the real sense, and to realize that beyond being fully human, there is also the divine nature of human beings. Beyond human wisdom is the "higher wisdom" which is attainable by that part of human beings which approximates the divine.

Education is mandated to make human beings fully human in the sense that students are helped to discover their potentials, and do something about their shortcomings in order to become useful citizens in the service of their families, their country and the world in general and ultimately their God Whoever they deem Him to be.

The general order of education is to teach, inform, impart knowledge and skills, and develop competencies for human beings to be economically productive. Beyond these, educational institutions, in varying degrees, interface the teaching-learning process with character education, values education, values formation, values transformation and other related strategies which include religious education and spirituality towards the development of the total personality of human beings, in order to be competitive in a globalized world.

"Higher wisdom" while rooted in spirituality inherent in all faiths and religions, goes beyond creeds, beliefs, and practices to the realm of being able to recognize and accept the wisdom beyond human efforts, that wisdom which orders everything rightly beyond and sometimes contrary to the logic of human effort and understanding and to blend these phenomena with the reality within grasp of the human mind.

What normally happens is that there is compartmentalized educational exposure to competencies and "higher wisdom." Spirituality comes out as a tool or a means to achieve human goals and objectives. It evolves to be something that will make the persons dreams, hopes, and aspirations become a reality; spirituality becomes output-oriented as far as desired objectives are concerned.

When spirituality becomes input-oriented as far as human beings are concerned, then "higher wisdom" finds a space in the scheme of being fully human which is ultimately the goal of education. As an input, "higher wisdom" is translated as that capacity to discern, understand and appreciate the meaning and significance of events quite different and divergent from the conventional order of human logic; a discernment which enables the human being to blend conventional wisdom with "higher wisdom."

In this process of blending, orientations and perspectives are enriched. Reactions and counter-reactions to the courses of events are re-designed to create a "renaissance" of approaches and strategies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Higher Wisdom' in Education and Governance; Educators Speak
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.