The Return of the Left; Old Democrats versus New Democrats

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 27, 2004 | Go to article overview

The Return of the Left; Old Democrats versus New Democrats


Byline: Tod Lindberg, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The left is back. I don't say this in relation to the Democratic convention in Boston, where, of course, in their heart of hearts, many of the delegates do indeed wish that their party could be more explicitly progressive in its appeal to American voters. The point of the Democratic convention will be to inject as much progressivism into the debate as the party's wise men and women think is prudent in relation to appealing to an electorate that is not especially left-wing in outlook.

Which is to say, what is going on in Boston is an exercise in seeming to be mainstream. And as any serious left-winger will tell you, seeming to be mainstream is most easily accomplished by being mainstream - in other words by selling out progressive principle.

No, the left that is back is the snarling, Michael Moore left. This is a left that hates poverty, war and injustice in general, and Republicans, oil companies, corporate fat cats and defense contractors in particular. America is a great country in principle, but in practice, which is to say under the thumb of those just listed, it is a corrupt system of cronyism in which the rich and well-connected rig the game to their own benefit, leaving everyone else out. In the left's America, politicians - especially Republican politicians - send young Americans off to die in wars whose real purpose is to win lucrative contracts for those who finance the careers of politicians. These wars, moreover, are invariably imperialist in character, bent on imposing American colonial will on subject peoples. American foreign policy can therefore be seen as imperial subjugation to serve the business interests of favored American corporations.

The preceding paragraph was actually somewhat difficult to write. I have had occasion to try to characterize left-wing thinking in America before, but not recently, and certainly not since I started writing this column eight years ago. I'm out of practice.

The reason is simply that the left has been gone, out of the picture, invisible, marginal. Oh, if you looked for it, you could find it, in the pages of the Nation, in politico-literary circles, among the European cultural elite. But as far as American national politics has been concerned - which is to say, insofar as we are talking about issues that have actually come before Congress, for example - this left has been simply irrelevant.

What happened to the left? Where did it go? Why the marginalization? And what brought it back? One probably has to start with the end of the Cold War on terms favorable to the United States and the steady generation-long march of democratization and liberalization (in the classical sense) around the globe.

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