The Debate: Should a Wind Farm Be Built in Liverpool Bay? Sam Lister Looks at the Pros and Cons of the Planned Site

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), July 27, 2004 | Go to article overview

The Debate: Should a Wind Farm Be Built in Liverpool Bay? Sam Lister Looks at the Pros and Cons of the Planned Site


Byline: Sam Lister

AN 80 square mile wind farm could be built off the Wirral coast.

NPower Renewables wants to install up to 200 turbines between West Kirby and North Wales in the Liverpool Bay.

The site, which would be the biggest in the area, would generate electricity for more than 600, 000 homes.

But the scheme has attracted criticism from some local residents who claim it will spoil the view.

Wildlife groups have raised concerns about the impact it would have on birds and there are also fears it would create a danger for shipping on the busy route.

But green campaigners say wind farms are the best way to generate power without damaging the environment and are much preferable to have a nuclear power station built in the area.

The plans are still at an early stage and the company will need to be granted a licence under the Food and Environmental Protection Act and the Coast Protection Act, as well planning permission.

A spokeswoman for NPower Renewables said: ``The Gwynt y Mor Wind Farm is at the early stages of development, however, a full and detailed environmental impact assessment for the project has begun.

``It is our policy to ensure that local communities are fully consulted and informed about proposals in advance of any planning application, and we will be holding public exhibitions in various locations along the coast in the near future.

``Details of dates and locations of these exhibitions will be widely publicised in advance, and we would encourage local people to take these opportunities to find out the facts about the Gwynt y Mor proposal, and wind power in general, and to feedback to us any comments and suggestions that they may have. ''

NO-Professor David Bellamy, botanist and TV presenter

In no way are they environmentally friendly

IHAVE been researching the impact of wind farms for more than 10 years. These things just don't work. How do you run hospitals and schools when the wind is not blowing?

You can't run the National Grid on intermittent power. They produce very little amounts of energy. Wind farms are not about real science. They are a science that is dominated by industry and are not going to solve the problem of finding a sustainable energy supply for the future.

We are building bigger roads and more airports, which is not environmentally friendly and ruin landscapes, but the government is determined to follow this policy of building more wind farms.

But in no way are they green or environmentally friendly. There are 1, 063 of these turbines, which I call Weapons of Mass Destruction, and they produce less than 0. 3% of all the power we use. With only 28% of our CO2 emissions coming from the production of electricity, this means that these turbines displace less than 0. 1% of total CO2 emissions.

People don't want to live near them and the off-shore ones cost so much money to build, which is all at the taxpayers' expense.

The government is doing all this because it wants to stop global warming, but I don't believe there is such a thing. There has been a lot of important research into it that dispels the myth. Global warming is down to natural fluctuations in weather patterns.

If the government is so concerned about the environment why are they financing the construction of coal-fired power stations in the third world?

We do not need wind farms. There are many other ways to combat global warming and provide us with energy.

As has been shown wind farms will actually do little to combat global warming, especially as energy demand continues to grow in the UK.

There are many other much more cost-effective ways to combat the problem.

These include making present power stations more efficient, controlling traffic and petrol consumption, developing other types of renewable energy and, most importantly, investing heavily in energy conservation. …

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