In Memoriam

Black Issues in Higher Education, June 17, 2004 | Go to article overview

In Memoriam


WALTER H. ANNENBERG--businessman; statesman; publisher; philanthropist, The Annenberg Foundation

ARTHUR ASHE--tennis legend; educator: social activist; organizer, Artists and Athletes Against Apartheid

DR. MARGUERITE ROSS BARNETT--educator; political scientist; administrator; first woman and first African American president, University of Houston

DR. ERNEST BOYER SR.--educator; scholar; president, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching; U.S. Commissioner of Education; chancellor, SUNY; recipient, Charles Frankel Prize in the Humanities

GWENDOLYN BROOKS--educator; poet laureate, Illinois; first African American Pulitzer Prize winner, poetry; 1994 Jefferson Lecturer, National Endowment for the Humanities, the highest award in the humanities given by the U.S. federal government

CLAUDE BROWN--author, Manchild in the Promised Land

RICKY BYRDSONG--former head basketball coach, Northwestern University; vice president, community affairs, Aon Corp.

JOAN PRESTON CERSTVIK--operations manager, Black Issues In Higher Education

DR. PATRICK CHAVIS--obstetrician/gynecologist; medical school admission sparked U.S. Supreme Court affirmative action battle

HENRY CHAUNCEY--former assistant dean of the faculty, chairman of the Committee on Scholarships, Harvard University; founder and president, Educational Testing Service (ETS); director, College Entrance Examination Board

DR. BARRARAT, CHRISTIAN--activist; author; editor; educator, University of California Berkeley; first African American woman granted tenure, full professor, UC-Berkeley

DR. JOHN HENRIK CLARKE--writer; activist; spiritualist; geopoliticist; liberation scholar; educator, Hunter College, Cornell University; originator, Afrocentricity

RAY DAVIS--Washington, D.C.-area student activist; founder, The DC Student Coalition Against Apartheid and Racism (DC SCAR)

DR. HAROLD DELANEY--mentor; executive vice president, American Association of State Colleges and Universities; special assistant to the chancellor, University of Maryland System; recipient, one of first two Howard University doctoral degrees

MATEL DAWSON JR.--forklift driver; investor; philanthropist; founder, Mat Dawson Jr. Endowed Scholarship, Wayne State University

DR. JEFF DONALDSON--art historian; aesthetics of Black arts movement scholar; critic; painter; educator; head, College of Fine Arts, Howard University; contributing founder, AFRI-COBRA (an acronym for African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists)

CHRISTOPHER FAIRFIELD EDLEY--prosecutor; civil rights attorney; president emeritus, United Negro College Fund

ARCHIE EPPS III--educator; editor, Speeches of Malcolm X at Harvard; former dean of students, Harvard University; publisher of first Harvard handbook on race relations

DR. HARLEY E. FLACK--scholar; musician; composer; fourth president, Wright State University

LEON FORREST--writer; novelist; essayist; educator, Northwestern University

J.P. FRANK--attorney; author; professor of law; contributor to Brown v. Board of Education argument

DR. RUTH SIMMS HAMILTON--sociologist; scholar; educator, Michigan State University; mentor; director, African Diaspora Research project

HENRY HAMPTON--documentary filmmaker; social justice advocate; founder, Blackside Productions Inc.; creator, "Eyes on the Prize" series; recipient, Charles Frankel Prize, National Endowment for the Humanities

A. LEON HIGGINBOTHAM--chief justice of the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals; educator, Harvard University; recipient, Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor

FRANK M. JOHNSON JR.--attorney; federal judge, 11th Circuit; "most hated man in Alabama," for striking down segregation laws

LOIS MAILOU JONES--painter; designer; educator, Howard University; cultural ambassador to Africa

BARBARA JORDAN--attorney; educator; state senator; U. …

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