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Call for Papers. "The Holocaust and Genocide in War Films." 2004 Film and History Conference. Dallas, Texas. 11-14 Nov. 2004. The Holocaust and Nazi racial policies have become central themes in documentaries and feature films about WW II. The portrayal of genocide as a key element in civil wars also appears in films like The Killing Fields, Ararat, and Vukovar. The Holocaust and Genocide area of the Film and History Conference is seeking paper and panel proposals which analyze films that explore the themes of genocide as racial war, and subsequent war crimes trials. Papers can focus on a single film, compare films on the same subject, and compare the depiction of genocide in films about different wars. Send proposals and inquiries to Lawrence Baron, Department of History, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182; lbaron@mail.sdsu.edu. For more conference information, see www.filmandhistory.org. Deadline: 30 July 2004.

Call for Articles. "Disability." 2005 Special Issue of Atenea. Submissions may address any aspect of disability, including disability studies as a field; representations of disability; and the intersections of gender, sexuality, race, politics, class, and disability. Submissions may be in English or Spanish. Essays should be between 4,000 and 5,0000 words, in MLA format, and should be accompanied by a brief abstract. Poetry and fiction should not exceed eight pages, and book reviews should be between 500 and 900 words. The author's name and address should appear only on a separate title page. Email inquiries to atenea@uprm.edu, but electronic submissions are not considered. Mail submissions in triplicate to Nandita Batra, Editor, Revista Atenea; Department of English, Box 9265; University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez; Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681. Deadline: 9 Aug. 2004.

Call For Articles. "GLBT Human Rights Issues." 2004 Special Issue of the Journal of Intergroup Relations. Guest Editor Jeffrey A. Nelson invites submissions that directly address human rights issues surrounding persons who identify as glbt. Possible topics include scholarly analyses of local, state, national, or international texts; reports of individual research studies that explore glbt human rights issues; descriptions of efforts by human rights workers to address growing concerns regarding discrimination against glbt persons; historical analyses of social movements geared toward glbt human rights; case studies of community efforts that have affected the social, organizational, or legal standing of glbt human rights; book reviews related to glbt issues; or personal or collaborative commentary on the including glbt as a protected class. An Information for Contributors and Manuscript Preparation Guidelines is included in the latter pages of each issue. Direct inquiries and submissions to Mark P. Orbe, Editor; Journal of Intergroup Relations; Department of Communication; Western Michigan University; Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5318; orbe@wmich.edu. Deadline: 1 Sept. 2004.

Call for Articles. "Physical, Cognitive, or Sensory Difference in US Multiethnic Literatures." MELUS Special Issue on the convergences of ethnic studies and disability studies in literary scholarship. Essays should explicitly locate themselves within a disability studies framework and engage with current debates in the field. Especially welcome are papers pertaining to any of the following issues as they manifest themselves in US multiethnic literatures: disability and immigrant, diasporic, border, and/or transnational identities; racial "passing"/hidden disability; social/political mobility; immigrants as socially/politically/linguistically disabled; bodies and the law; art and advocacy; illness/AIDS/medical care; reproduction/sterilization; "normalizing" medical procedures; injury, war, veterans; trauma; racial/ethnic bodies as congenitally and/or medically defective or diseased; medicalization of difference; freak shows; violence and hate crimes; disabled bodies in ethnic folklore; the racial/ethnic grotesque; subjectivity and embodiment; race/ethnic/disabled theory; hybrid and/or cyborg bodies; disability and narrative strategies. …

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