Historical Horses: Until Relatively Recently, the Horse Has Played a Significant Role in the Everyday Lives of People across the World, Octavia Lamb Explores the Horse's Place in History with a Series of Images from the Archives of the RGS-IBG

By Lamb, Octavia | Geographical, August 2004 | Go to article overview

Historical Horses: Until Relatively Recently, the Horse Has Played a Significant Role in the Everyday Lives of People across the World, Octavia Lamb Explores the Horse's Place in History with a Series of Images from the Archives of the RGS-IBG


Lamb, Octavia, Geographical


The dog may be man's best friend, but the horse is his most useful. Without it, the development of human society would probably have taken a different course. Although horses first evolved around 55 million years ago, humans first came into contact with them about 50,000 years ago, when the Cro Magnons began hunting them. It was to be another 40,000 years or so before the techniques of animal husbandry developed, in what is now Iraq, where cattle were first kept as livestock for labour, food and skins. Goats, sheep and dogs were next to be domesticated, followed by horses, probably around 5,000 or 6,000 years ago.

At first, farmers kept horses for their meat and milk, but they subsequently began to use them as pack animals and eventually to pull carts. Although animal-drawn carts weren't new, the strength, speed and endurance of the horse revolutionised the practice, and it wasn't long before these qualities took horses onto the battlefield: the Shang Dynasty Chinese began using horse-drawn war chariots in around 1450 BC. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Historical Horses: Until Relatively Recently, the Horse Has Played a Significant Role in the Everyday Lives of People across the World, Octavia Lamb Explores the Horse's Place in History with a Series of Images from the Archives of the RGS-IBG
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.