The Road to Equality; Capturing the Voices of Civil Rights

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 5, 2004 | Go to article overview

The Road to Equality; Capturing the Voices of Civil Rights


Byline: Wade Henderson and William Novelli, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

This week, the Mall served as the first stop of a nationwide bus tour to recognize those who gave life to the civil-rights movement and to preserve their stories of courage and struggle. But the tour is not just about preserving the past. It's about compelling a new generation of leaders to blaze their own path to advance equality and justice.

The bus tour will span 70 days and travel through 35 cities. It's no coincidence that we have launched this effort in 2004, a year in which we are commemorating two pivotal anniversaries in the history of the civil-rights movement: the 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education and passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. These singular events respectively struck down government-sanctioned segregation and effectively outlawed discrimination against black Americans, Hispanics, women and others.

The movement sparked by the Brown decision mobilized a generation to support enactment of the 1964 Act and involved thousands of ordinary citizens. While most Americans are familiar with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, Cesar Chavez and Bella Abzug, the stories of those who rode the buses, sat at the lunch counters and marched in the streets are hardly known, remembered or recorded.

To capture these memories, AARP, the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Library of Congress joined together and created the Voices of Civil Rights project. To date, more than 2,000 firsthand accounts of the civil-rights struggle have been collected. But thousands more, vivid only in the minds and hearts of individuals who were there, have yet to be told. To reach them, we have taken to the road in a modern-day Freedom Bus, closely tracking the route of the 1961 Freedom Riders.

While we may be using traditional means of transportation, we have the benefit of modern technology to ease the task of collecting thousands of stories and sharing them in real time. The collection, which will be digitized and housed at the Library of Congress, will be freely accessible to researchers and the public alike. …

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