Surveying Masculine Culture

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 8, 2004 | Go to article overview

Surveying Masculine Culture


Byline: Ann Geracimos, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The length and breadth of this valuable work shoudn't deter readers from tackling it. Leo Braudy's new book "From Chivalry to Terrorism: War and the Changing Nature of Masculinity" is a comprehensive account of the changing views of masculinity and how they influence our politics and social relations. If the title is wordy, even awkward, the thinking is deep. (Mea culpa: This reviewer is an acquaintance of Mr. Braudy.)

What better time for it than now, when military directives dominate the news and we are reminded daily how men and women in uniform represent our national honor around the world? The changing nature of the American military machine and its mission invites speculation on how policy matters will affect those most involved - and vice versa.

The subject is vast, but there is little reason to believe Mr. Braudy can't cover it. Perhaps best known for his searching book on the nature of celebrity, "The Frenzy of Renown," a 1987 National Book Critics Circle Award finalist, he has again amassed more than enough material to service a host of seminars and college courses.

"'From Chivalry To Terrorism' is a work of synthesis," he writes. "Readers looking for new research will probably not find it here. What they will find, I hope, are new juxtapositions of subjects usually thought to be unrelated and new interpretations of old assumptions about the relation of men to war." He finds ways of connecting sexuality and technology, citizenship and racism, war and pornography . Which, of course, is the point of taking on such an open-ended project.

There is a wealth of intellectual insight to be found on nearly every page, sometimes offered at a dizzying speed, jumping from Elizabethan England to ancient Greece and back again with barely a pause. Mr. Braudy's approach is professorial to the last degree, which isn't surprising. He has been a professor of English literature at several institutions of renown, currently the University of Southern California. His other previous published works include books on film history and criticism.

His speculations here will provoke debate across the spectrum on the notion of the heroic. The old argument and tension between nature and nurture is only one of the issues explored. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Surveying Masculine Culture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.