Missouri and Marriage

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 10, 2004 | Go to article overview

Missouri and Marriage


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Being a Missourian, I find it quite amusing that Cheryl Jacques, president of the nation's largest homosexual-activist group and a non-Missourian, finds herself an expert on Missouri and Missouri politics ("Missouri vote sparks action by gay activists," Page 1, Thursday).

She blamed the traditional-marriage amendment on President Bush, saying it was his effort to "distract Missourians from the fact that the state has lost almost 80,000 jobs in the past 31/2 years." There are several flaws to this viewpoint.

The first would be the simple fact that Missouri legislators decided to bring the issue to voters in the wake of the Massachusetts Supreme Court overturning a law banning same-sex "marriage" there.

Yes, there is a marriage law on the books here, but we all know it was only a matter of time before someone challenged it. The amendment now makes it clear, it is not unconstitutional in Missouri to ban same-sex "marriage."

Secondly, it seems that Ms. …

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