D.C. Agency to Review Businesses' Defenses; Smaller Companies Vulnerable to Effects of Major Terrorist Attack

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 10, 2004 | Go to article overview

D.C. Agency to Review Businesses' Defenses; Smaller Companies Vulnerable to Effects of Major Terrorist Attack


Byline: Tom Ramstack, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The D.C. Office of Homeland Security is preparing to assess the vulnerability of the area's business community to a major terrorist attack.

The agency is seeking consultants for a $4.9 million Citizen Education Campaign that includes an effort to find weak spots in the private sector's defenses and recommend ways to prepare for an attack.

The proposals are due at the end of the month, and the study is scheduled to begin in the fall.

Although information on preparedness of the business community is sketchy, early indications show that smaller companies would be least able to withstand loss of life, property damage and prolonged loss of business that could result from an attack. They also are least likely to invest in security measures.

"It's not that they're less willing; they have fewer resources to do it," said Caroline Cunningham, a vice president of the Greater Washington Board of Trade.

The board classifies more than 80 percent of the Washington area's businesses as small.

The Conference Board, a New York business-research group, reached similar conclusions in its study of midsized companies with annual revenue of $20 million to $1 billion.

The biggest of the 100 companies surveyed considered their security expenses as a sound investment, but the smaller companies think of them as a burden, according to the Conference Board report.

"Most surveyed companies, however, report little increase in security spending since 9/11," the report said.

Big budgets are not needed for many security measures, the board of trade said. The measures include:

*Developing a business-continuity plan. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

D.C. Agency to Review Businesses' Defenses; Smaller Companies Vulnerable to Effects of Major Terrorist Attack
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.