Office Style: Good Hair Day; You'll Get a New Look and Learn All about the Secrets of Hair If You Win a Visit to the Natural History Museum

The Birmingham Post (England), August 11, 2004 | Go to article overview

Office Style: Good Hair Day; You'll Get a New Look and Learn All about the Secrets of Hair If You Win a Visit to the Natural History Museum


Post Style invites you to unravel the secrets of your hair at the Natural History Museum, London with its summer exhibition Hair, and get a brand new look with a L'Oreal hairstylist for you and a friend. Long or short, straight or curly, dark or blonde, hair reveals more about your personal beliefs, age, habits and lifestyle than any other part of your body. A visit to Hair will show there's more to a bad hair day than meets the eye.

Designed and produced by L'Oreal and La Cite des Sciences et de I'Industrie in Paris, Hair tells its story from four perspectives: its fascinating biology, how science is improving hair control, hair fashion through time and its influence on culture around the world. A visit to Hair will certainly show there's more to a bad hair day than meets the eye.

What does your hair say about you? Reveal information about your race, lifestyle and behaviour. Can you spot a vegetarian, athletic swimmer or a punk from a single strand of hair? Become a forensic scientist to solve a crime from the primary piece of evidence - hair found at the crime scene. Magnify strands of your own hair a thousand times with a videomicroscope lens to assess its health, shape and true colour. Hair is a complex mix of cells artfully bonded together, creating 120,000 strands that grow one centimetre each month and survive between three to four years. Discover the age of your own hair and find out why sometimes it stops growing altogether.

What about the science behind shampoo, hair dye, perms and blowdrying? Find out why 'grey' hair doesn't exist. See how laboratoriesuse shaking wigs, extensionmeters and light simulators to test hair products.

Ever wanted to try a new hairstyle but were too scared? Or had your haircut and cried at the result? Take the risk out of a drastic haircut by trying one of 40 styles in the virtual hair salon.

With mohawks, dreadlocks, Afros, braids, mullets and bobs, hair can also be the ultimate fashion statement. See how hairstyles have changed through time and influenced different cultures across the world.

Consider what your hair says about you and how it makes you feel. Share your thoughts with other visitors by adding your comment to the 'hairy' message board.

A series of talks, workshops and events linked to Hair will take place at the Natural History Museum throughout the exhibition season. One winner and a friend will win travel to and from London with their local train company with entry into Hair at the Natural History Museum. …

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Office Style: Good Hair Day; You'll Get a New Look and Learn All about the Secrets of Hair If You Win a Visit to the Natural History Museum
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