Heart Drugs Trial Offers Hope for Blacks; Combination of Two Older Drugs Worked So Well in Trials That Tests Stopped Early

By Black, Cherie | The Florida Times Union, August 22, 2004 | Go to article overview

Heart Drugs Trial Offers Hope for Blacks; Combination of Two Older Drugs Worked So Well in Trials That Tests Stopped Early


Black, Cherie, The Florida Times Union


Byline: CHERIE BLACK, The Times-Union

As he described the deliciously forbidden taste of his secret-recipe collard greens and smothered pork chops, Robert Jones knew the homemade feasts he and his mother enjoyed could now happen only on rare occasions.

After seven bypass surgeries in two years, the 60-year-old Jacksonville man's eating habits and lifestyle have drastically changed. His mother's have changed as well. Three years ago, Geneva Jones underwent open-heart surgery and now swallows more than a dozen pills a day to help maintain her health. Her son drives her to and from doctor's appointments almost daily.

But the success of a recent clinical trial could help the Joneses with their history of heart problems.

In July 2001, Geneva Jones joined more than 1,000 patients nationwide -- 10 in Jacksonville -- in a clinical trial testing a new drug that could better help African-Americans with heart failure.

The African-American Heart Failure Trial, or A-HeFT, targeted African-American men and women with moderate to severe heart failure and those whose hearts didn't pump blood efficiently. The trial was conducted at 170 sites across the country, including Shands Jacksonville.

It was designed to see if the drug BiDil, along with standard heart-failure therapies, can reduce mortality and hospitalization rates and improve the quality of life for African-Americans with heart failure.

BiDil is a combination of two generic medications already available on the market; it enhances the benefits of nitric oxide in heart patients. Nitric oxide, a substance produced by cells, protects the heart and arteries from damage. African-Americans suffering from heart failure are more likely to be nitric oxide deficient.

The trial was expected to be completed in early 2005 but was stopped in July after researchers and NitroMed Inc., the company testing the drug, saw the drug had significant survival benefits for patients in the trial.

"You do all this drug development and you find two old drugs that work, it's amazing," said Alan Miller, University of Florida cardiologist and professor of medicine, who led the trial at Shands. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Heart Drugs Trial Offers Hope for Blacks; Combination of Two Older Drugs Worked So Well in Trials That Tests Stopped Early
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.