Olympics Shorts

The Journal (Newcastle, England), August 27, 2004 | Go to article overview

Olympics Shorts


Politics: United States Olympic officials have called on President George W Bush to remove the image of the five Olympic rings from a television advert being used to promote his election campaign. The trademark emblem of the Olympic movement features in the broadcast in which a voice-over states: "In 1972, there were 40 democracies in the world. Today, 120. Freedom is spreading throughout the world like a sunrise. And this Olympics there will be two more free nations. And two fewer terrorist regimes." The nations to which it refers are Iraq and Afghanistan.

HOCKEY: Germany pulled off one of the shocks of recent times by beating favourites Holland 2-1 to win women's gold ( the first in their hockey history at the Olympics. The Germans had scored just six goals in five matches ( which included a 4-1 defeat to the Dutch before yesterday.

LONDON BID: The London bid team insist Matthew Pinsent's failure to keep his position on the International Olympic Committee will not affect their chances of landing the 2012 Games. Pinsent lost his place on the IOC Athletes' Commission to Czech javelin thrower Jan Zelezny yesterday. However, the campaigners, led by Lord Coe, do not believe this is a blow to the London bid, not least because Pinsent would not have been able to vote on the 2012 candidates until the bid was eliminated.

TAEKWONDO: A recurrence of a groin injury shattered Paul Green's hopes of a medal, as he went out of the tournament at the quarter-final stage. The 27-year-old, who won world silver in 2003, sustained a groin injury two months ago which flared up again in his opening-round victory over India's Satriyo Rahadhani. …

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