Sudan African-Americans Want Action on Darfur: Enraged with the Slow Global Action on the Darfur Crisis, African-American Congressmen Are Resorting to Direct Action against Sudan to Draw Attention to the "Genocide" Being Committed by the Government-Backed Janjaweed Militia. Nate Clay and Bob Rhodes Report

By Clay, Nate; Rhodes, Bob | New African, August-September 2004 | Go to article overview

Sudan African-Americans Want Action on Darfur: Enraged with the Slow Global Action on the Darfur Crisis, African-American Congressmen Are Resorting to Direct Action against Sudan to Draw Attention to the "Genocide" Being Committed by the Government-Backed Janjaweed Militia. Nate Clay and Bob Rhodes Report


Clay, Nate, Rhodes, Bob, New African


It is not just hot winds blowing across the wide expanse of the Sahara Desert causing the Sudanese president, Omar el-Bashir, to feel a little hot under the collar. It is the angry windstorms of African-American congressmen and women demanding action against the National Islamic Front (NIF) government in the Sudan.

Joined by anti-slavery activists as diverse as the Switzerland-based Christian Solidarity International (CSI) and the primarily African-American Sudan Campaign, the congressmen have launched a high-profile civil disobedience crusade to highlight the ongoing atrocities committed by the government-sponsored militiamen known as the Janjaweed.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The actions of the congressmen were launched to coincide with the visit to Darfur by the UN secretary-general Kofi Annan and the US secretary of state Colin Powell. A Washington DC radio talk show host, Joe Madison, and former Congressman Walter Fauntroy organised the Sudan Campaign. The "strategy", says Emile Milne, public relations director for New York Congressman, Charlie Rangel, "is to get one prominent person arrested each day". Asked how long they plan to continue with this game plan, Milne replied: "As long as it takes to bring the Sudanese government to its knees."

Confronted with the documented evidence of large-scale suffering provided by international aid workers, UN officials and reporters from several media outlets, the government in Khartoum claims that the mass suffering has been caused by the armed rebels in Darfur.

Driven by these images, Rangel, 74, went to the Sudanese embassy in Massachusetts Avenue in northwest Washington on 13 July, blocked the entrance and struck a defiant pose. He was arrested, handcuffed and led to a waiting police van. He shouted to the crowd of protesters cheering him on: "When human lives are in jeopardy, there should be outrage." The following day, the Chicago Congressman, Bobby Rush, was also arrested. Twenty years ago, Rangel, a Democratic Party member of the powerful Ways and Means Committee of the House of Representatives, was arrested outside the South African embassy protesting against the apartheid system then in place in that country. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sudan African-Americans Want Action on Darfur: Enraged with the Slow Global Action on the Darfur Crisis, African-American Congressmen Are Resorting to Direct Action against Sudan to Draw Attention to the "Genocide" Being Committed by the Government-Backed Janjaweed Militia. Nate Clay and Bob Rhodes Report
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.