NLC Full of Activities for Member Cities, Towns

Nation's Cities Weekly, August 30, 2004 | Go to article overview

NLC Full of Activities for Member Cities, Towns


Welcome to Members Matter! This column highlights NLC member benefits, programs, services and other tidbits of information available to members.

Welcome New Members

1. Town of Vienna, Md.--pop. 288--The Honorable Russell Brinsfield, Mayor

A scenic village on the western bank of the Nanticoke River in southeastern Dorchester County, Vienna was originally known as "the town on the Nanticoke River" until 1706. In the early days, the town thrived as a trade center for tobacco, becoming very important to commerce as the location for the first shipyard built on the Nanticoke River. Recently, its elementary school was selected as a Maryland Blue Ribbon School, and its annual Shad Festival draws nearly 1,000 visitors.

2. City of Parkville, Mo.--pop. 4,059--The Honorable Kathryn Dusenbery, Mayor

Nestled in the natural beauty of wooded hills and river-carved limestone bluffs, Parkville, "Where the Missouri Comes Alive," was originally a thriving Missouri River port town bustling with a healthy commerce of hemp, furs, and other products. After a period of near economic collapse when proslavery factions and abolitionists clashed, the town was rejuvenated with the establishment of Park College in 1875. Today, Parkville represents a marvelous mix of antiques, crafts, specialty shops and restaurants.

3. Town of Laurel, Del.--pop. 3,668--The Honorable John J. Shwed, Mayor

Founded in 1683, Laurel is home to more historic buildings than any other town in Delaware, with 800 on the National Historic Record. The town was plotted in 1802 after the sale of an Indian reservation along the Broad Creek, and named for the laurel trees growing along the creek's banks. It is well known for its great water recreation spots, including Trap Pond and Trussum Pond, homes to the northernmost natural stand of bald cypress trees in North America, including the two tallest trees in Delaware.

4. Town of North Kingstown, R.I.--pop. 24,743--The Honorable Elizabeth Dolan, President

This "sea town" is famous as a summer resort and haven for pleasure because of its natural harbor and beaches. It is home to Casey Farm, one of the oldest working farms in New England. During World War II, the building of the Quonset Naval Air Station changed the town to a key naval station. Today, North Kingstown is not only home to the "Seabee," designed by a native Rhode Islander and now part of an historic museum, but also Rhode Island's largest economic potential featuring a deep-water port, rail lines and the state's longest runway.

5. City of East St. Louis, Ill.--pop. 31,542--The Honorable Carl E. Officer, President

In 1861 a questionable election resulted in the merger of Illinoistown, the town of St. Clair, and the town of East St. Louis into one corporate unit to be named the town of East St. Louis. John Bowman was elected the first executive. East St.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

NLC Full of Activities for Member Cities, Towns
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.