Kerry Campaign Denies 'Shake-Up'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 7, 2004 | Go to article overview

Kerry Campaign Denies 'Shake-Up'


Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

CANONSBURG, Pa - Democratic presidential nominee Sen. John Kerry's campaign spokesmen yesterday denied that there's a "shake-up" of the campaign, despite the infusion of new Democratic blood into the staff and an overhaul of the candidate's stump speech.

Under new directions from former President Bill Clinton - the only Democrat to win the White House in a quarter of a century - Mr. Kerry is shedding talk of his own Vietnam War record. He spent Labor Day blaming President Bush for current economic conditions, which he invokes the Great Depression to describe.

"The problem is very clear, isn't it?" Mr. Kerry said. "Wages going down, cost of living going up, jobs that replace them pay less, standard of living goes down. John Edwards and I believe we can raise the standard of living in America again."

Despite the signs that Mr. Kerry is revamping his campaign team as Mr. Bush reaches a double-digit lead over him in the polls, the campaign adamantly says it isn't so.

"There is no shake-up," spokesman David Wade said. "In the last 60 days of the election, we've been lucky enough to add some tested, talented people to the campaign."

The rewritten stump speech also comes after Mr. Clinton conferred with Mr. Kerry this weekend by telephone from his New York hospital room, where he was preparing for quadruple heart-bypass surgery. Mr. Kerry's speech and campaign team have adopted the theme that Mr. Clinton used to beat President Bush's father in 1992 - "It's the economy, stupid."

In an early morning front-porch gathering here yesterday, Mr. Kerry's opening remarks focused entirely on economic and domestic issues.

He didn't mention the war in Iraq or his service in Vietnam - usually staples of his stump speech - until supporters in the audience raised the issues.

Even then, Mr. Kerry used those opportunities to guide the informal neighborhood conversation back to domestic issues.

After one supporter rose to call Mr. Kerry "a true American hero" for his service in Vietnam and apologize on behalf of "those who have not served who had the audacity to question you," Mr. Kerry thanked him and quickly returned to the economy.

"What bothers me is they're using it to cover the attacks on you," Mr. Kerry said of the television commercials produced by Swift Boat Veterans for Truth that questioned some of his conduct during the Vietnam War.

"They're using it to cover what's really happening to your budget. They're using it to not explain to America why outsourcing jobs, they think, is something to celebrate," he said.

Mr. Kerry has hired several campaign strategists who once worked for Mr. Clinton and earlier Democratic candidates.

Former White House spokesman Joe Lockhart joined the campaign last week and has been traveling with Mr.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Kerry Campaign Denies 'Shake-Up'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.