ICE Embraces Role in Homeland Security; Complex Merger of Law Enforcement Has 'Come a Very Long Way'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 13, 2004 | Go to article overview

ICE Embraces Role in Homeland Security; Complex Merger of Law Enforcement Has 'Come a Very Long Way'


Byline: Jerry Seper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A once-fragmented collection of understaffed and underfunded federal investigative and intelligence agencies has moved slowly during the past 18 months into its new role as the investigative arm of the Department of Homeland Security.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) inherited not only 20,000 agents, investigators and support personnel from the U.S. Customs Service, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, Federal Protective Service, and Federal Air Marshal Service, but also a multitude of long-standing problems and a host of new ones.

Created March 1, 2003, ICE has been described as the most complicated law-enforcement merger within the Department Homeland Security, uniting different jobs, missions, philosophies and responsibilities to prevent terrorists and others from exploiting America's financial systems and immigration-enforcement policies.

"A number of agencies sent pieces of themselves to ICE and it has taken a tremendous effort by everyone, particularly those in the field, to try to create a program from scratch," Department of Homeland Security Assistant Secretary Michael J. Garcia, who heads ICE, told The Washington Times.

"This transition is unprecedented, but the men and women on the front lines didn't lose a step," Mr. Garcia said. "Not only are they doing new things, they are doing them well. I am confident everything the people in ICE have built and will build will survive."

Mr. Garcia acknowledged that problems continue, including a lack of funding for manpower, resources and equipment, and some employees' concerns about the agency's mission and its complex administrative system, but he is confident that the agency is moving ahead.

"It has taken time to find out ICE's role in preventing a new act of terrorism, where we fit in the overall picture, how we learn and adapt, what tools we need to get the job done, and how to use them more aggressively," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

ICE Embraces Role in Homeland Security; Complex Merger of Law Enforcement Has 'Come a Very Long Way'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.