Awards & Prizes

American Theatre, September 2004 | Go to article overview

Awards & Prizes


Playwright Tina Howe will be honored with the William Inge Theatre Festival's distinguished achievement in American theatre award during a tribute at the Kansas-based festival's April 2005 outing. "Tina Howe is universally respected by her peers, has productions of her plays all over America, but is not, yet, a household name," said artistic director Peter Ellenstein. "We hope that honoring her at the Inge Festival will introduce more of the American public to her unique voice." Howe writes about her latest works, translations of Ionesco's The Bald Soprano and The Lesson, in this issue, page 30.

Playwright Susan Miller (My Left Breast) stacks up the accolades for her A Map of Doubt and Rescue, which previously won the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize and has now earned the Pinter Review Prize for Drama as well. The honor includes $1,000 and publication by University of Tampa Press.

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Arkansas Repertory Theatre conferred its second Kaufman & Hart Prize for new American comedy upon Catherine Butterfield's The Sleeper. The biennial award, given in honor of George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart, includes a prize of $10,000 and a staged reading as part of the theatre's mainstage season. Two finalists, Honour Kane (autodelete://beginning dump of physical memory//) and James McLindon (Distant Music), received $1,000 each.

Dame Judi Dench joined the ranks of Sir Anthony Hopkins, Fiona Shaw and Kevin Kline, among others, when the Shakespeare Theatre of Washington, D.C., honored her with its Will Award in May. The award honors her distinguished work in classical theatre--a career that ranges from London's Old Vic Company, Royal Shakespeare Company and Royal National Theatre to Broadway.

Also joining an illustrious group--including Ira Gershwin, Tommy Tune and Susan Stroman--is Gerald Schoenfeld, who garnered the Goodspeed Award for outstanding contribution to musical theatre in June. Presented by Connecticut's Goodspeed Musicals, the award recognizes the impact that both Schoenfeld and the Shubert Organization have made on theatre in the past 30 years.

New York City's York Theatre Company feted Carol Channing at a gala event in June and presented the actress with the Oscar Hammerstein Award for lifetime achievement in musical theatre.

This year's Off-Off Broadway Review Awards yielded a triple honor for the Vital Theatre Company for its productions of Idiot's Delight, King of Mackie Street and The Ballad of Irving the Frog and Other Tales. For the complete list of winners, see www.tcg.org.

Portland Center Stage of Oregon's artistic director Chris Coleman will be an American Leadership Forum of Oregon fellow for the 2004-05 year--the only representative of the arts community chosen. …

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