Tips for Teaching Kids to Respect Copyrights: On Behalf of the Business Software Alliance, a Writer Warns of Pirates in the Classroom

By Snyder, Melanie G. | Curriculum Review, September 2004 | Go to article overview

Tips for Teaching Kids to Respect Copyrights: On Behalf of the Business Software Alliance, a Writer Warns of Pirates in the Classroom


Snyder, Melanie G., Curriculum Review


Do you have pirates in your classroom? No, not one-eyed swashbucklers stealing gold and jewels, but students who illegally copy or download copyrighted materials, including software and Internet content. "Possibly the most pervasive form of cheating, electronic piracy has lost its taboo," says David Callahan in The Cheating Culture: Why More Americans Are Doing Wrong to Get Ahead (Harcourt, 2004).

Part of the problem is an "everybody does it" mentality. A new poll from Harris Interactive found that a majority of youth are aware that digital media files are copyrighted, yet many of them admit to downloading files anyway. "When 'everybody does it,' or imagines that everybody does it, a cheating culture has emerged," says Callahan. The challenge for educators is to convey clear messages to students to prevent a cheating culture from becoming pervasive in school.

First and foremost, students must understand that copying or downloading copyrighted digital works without paying for them or without explicit permission from the creator is stealing--no different than going into a store and shoplifting a software program, book or magazine from the shelf. You can help your students understand that it's not okay to take someone else's creative work product without paying for it or having their permission says Bob Kruger, who leads anti-piracy programs for the Business Software Alliance. Though terms like "copyright" and "intellectual property" may be difficult to convey to students, the most powerful way to connect with them may be to tie cyber-ethics to their own inherent creativity. Students create things all the time, from artwork and music to essays, stories and poems. "Show students how copyright and intellectual property laws relate to them by explaining that, just as they wouldn't want someone taking or using their creative work without their permission, neither do software programmers or others who have created such works," Kruger suggests.

Students also can benefit from an explanation of the economics involved in creating and selling creative works and how piracy impacts those economics. This approach helps overcome the misconception that piracy doesn't hurt anyone. Ironically, piracy may hurt the pirates. When piracy prevents software developers and video game creators from getting back the investment they've made on the works they've already created, they may scale back on creating anything new, thereby reducing the number of available software packages and game--"a bleak prospect for most 21st-century kids," says Kruger.

Students also need to understand the consequences of violating copyright laws, including potential legal action against pirates by the creators or organizations that represent them (witness the recent lawsuits by the Recording Industry Association of America against people who illegally uploaded and shared music files over the Internet).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tips for Teaching Kids to Respect Copyrights: On Behalf of the Business Software Alliance, a Writer Warns of Pirates in the Classroom
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.