Fundamentalist Shi'ites; "We Will Defeat Iraq and Then Chase the Americans out of the Middle East with Their Own Weapons." - Ayatollah Khomeini (1980)

Manila Bulletin, September 28, 2004 | Go to article overview
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Fundamentalist Shi'ites; "We Will Defeat Iraq and Then Chase the Americans out of the Middle East with Their Own Weapons." - Ayatollah Khomeini (1980)


IF there are today approximately one million and a half overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) working in the Middle East and countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea basin, with currently 4,000 workers in high-risk Iraq, it is to the self-preservation and national security interest of the Philippines to monitor closely the deep-seated animosity, political tensions, and bitter histories that characterize the policies and outlook of Middle East countries, such as Iran, Iraq, and Lebanon where the majority of the respective populations belong to the Shiite religious sect, or adherents of the Shia branch of Islam, and where Shiite Muslim mullahs, or clerics, are followed fanatically and blindly by the majority of the citizens which are mostly impoverished.

Although the Shiites of Iraq and Lebanon, and a minority in Syria and Jordan, are Arabs, non-Arab Iran is the original seat and inspiration of Shiism which is today under the firm control of the mullahs under an autocratic Islamist fundamentalist government.

What this all means is that, over the last 25 years, since Ayatollah Khomeini overthrew the Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, in 1979, then reimposed and exported Islamic fundamentalism, and supported terrorism before the advent of al-Qaeda, the American hostage-taking in Teheran in the eighties, the hostage-taking, bombings, and civil disorders in Lebanon in the nineties, and the looming civil war in Iraq today are all interrelated that point to an American quagmire in Iraq.

By the way, the reader may be intrigued to know that the origin of the term "assassination" came from Persia (Iran). "Hashashin," or "addicts of the drug hashish, was a secret order of religious fanatics in the 11th-12th Century from the Ismaili branch of the Shiite sect, which was founded and led by Hasan ibn al-Sabah, a Persian Fatamid missionary known to the Christian Crusaders as Shaykh al-Jabal," who had uncanny similarities to 20th century Khomeini and his successors in that "Irans mullahs, Shiite Muslim clerics, extol martyrdom promising direct entry into paradise to all the fallen." Iran is the original home of the Brotherhood of Assassins.

It will be recalled that the overthrow, exile, and death (1979-80) of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the Shah of Shahs of the Peacock Throne, ended 2,500 years of monarchy in Iran when the United States not only abandoned the Shah but also shifted its support to Khomeini by clandestinely supplying the fundamentalist revolutionary government with arms to fight Iraq, during the Iran-Iraq War, while also supporting then Saddam Hussein with arms and satellite information against Iranian military deployment.

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Fundamentalist Shi'ites; "We Will Defeat Iraq and Then Chase the Americans out of the Middle East with Their Own Weapons." - Ayatollah Khomeini (1980)
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