Teaching Torture Congress Keeps School of the Americas Alive

By Weismann, Steve; Ireland, Doug | Canadian Dimension, September-October 2004 | Go to article overview

Teaching Torture Congress Keeps School of the Americas Alive


Weismann, Steve, Ireland, Doug, Canadian Dimension


The U.S. Congress recently passed a renewed appropriation to keep open the most infamous torture-teaching institution, the School of the Americas (SOA), where the teaching of Abu Ghraib-type illegal physical and psychological abuse has long been routine. The history of SOA involvement in torture has been documented in Amnesty International's 2002 report, "Unmatched Power, Unmet Principles."

In 2000, the Pentagon changed the name to the Western Hemispheric Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC). But, as the late GOP Senator Paul Coverdale of Georgia (where SOA-WHINSEC is located) suggests, the changes were "basically cosmetic." The lobbying campaign to close SOA-WHINSEC has been led by School of the Americas Watch, a lobbying group founded by religious activists following the 1990s murder of four U.S. nuns by Salvadoran death squads under SOA leadership.

Use of torture as imperial policy goes back at least to the days of JFK. When Kennedy entered the White House in 1961, he and his advisors looked warily at the growing nationalism among the old European colonies. Self-proclaimed communists--like Ho Chi Minh in Vietnam or Fidel Castro in Cuba--raised a red flag, while even non-communists--like Sukarno in Indonesia--threatened Western control of oil and strategic minerals.

Whether to elicit information or simply to terrorize the opposition, torture had historically played a role in holding down rebellious population. But, always in character, the New Frontier brought new thinking to bear.

The theory came initially from the CIA's Office of Science and Technology, which spent a fortune studying how to make unwilling people talk. Starting in the 1950s, the spooky scientists tested LSD and other drugs, brainwashing, hypnosis, polygraphs, electric shock and a wide range of other physical and psychological pressures.

They also borrowed from the French, who perfected their torture techniques in losing colonial wars against the Vietnamese and Algerians. No doubt, the British "cousins" also offered ideas from their equally nasty effort to hold an empire together.

The CIA summed up this macabre research in a classified manual they called "KUBARK Counter Intelligence Interrogation--July 1963. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Teaching Torture Congress Keeps School of the Americas Alive
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.