Charter Schools: Waste, Wonder or Solution? A National Report Shows Charter Students Lag Behind Traditional School Students, but Critics Say That's Not the Whole Story

By Pascopella, Angela | District Administration, October 2004 | Go to article overview

Charter Schools: Waste, Wonder or Solution? A National Report Shows Charter Students Lag Behind Traditional School Students, but Critics Say That's Not the Whole Story


Pascopella, Angela, District Administration


Controversy is swirling in education circles after results of national test scores show charter schools, considered an alternative to public schools in the No Child Left Behind act, may not be what they are cracked up to be.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress results for 2003 show that fourth graders in charter schools performed about a half year behind their peers in traditional public schools in reading and math even when comparing students eligible for free lunch or comparing students in central cities.

NAEP, otherwise dubbed the nation's report card, is a math and reading test given to fourth and eighth graders nationwide. For the first time, the 2003 results include charter school fourth graders after a May 2002 resolution by the National Assessment Governing Board.

When NAEP results were released last November, charter versus traditional public school results were not publicized, according to Celia Lose, spokeswoman for the American Federation of Teachers.

But AFT's researchers, led by Howard Nelson, dug up the results starting with a Google search of "NAEP data tool" and fed them to The New York Times, which released a front-page story in August. "Charter schools, in every comparison [including race], were at a lower level," Nelson says, despite the very low numbers of the sample size that would create an insignificant statistical comparison among black and/or Hispanic students.

But the story created an uproar among educators, including the Charter School Leadership Council, Edison Charter Schools and the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, a charter supporter and an organization that asked for the comparison between charter and public schools in NAEP.

With the presidential election next month, it is worth noting that President Bush supports charter schools, as does Sen. John Kerry, although Kerry opposes vouchers.

While AFT is "not anti-charter school," Lose says, the results reveal that "charter school students do worse than or as well as similar students in traditional public schools."

So despite some popular thought, charter schools are "not the magic pill for what ails traditional public schools," Lose says.

BEYOND THE STATISTICS

Charter school proponents disagree with results presented in the Times, saying the information didn't account for race and didn't show how charter students usually start off below grade level and have to play catch up.

U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige issued a statement, saying in part that the article failed to distinguish between students falling behind and those "climbing out of the hole." "The thousands of names on waiting lists to attend charter schools attest to the need for these vital educational options," he added.

"This is sloppy, sloppy, sloppy statistical work," says Andy Smarick, director of Charter School Leadership Council. "They didn't control for race" considering that black students tend to perform lower on standardized tests while comprising a larger percentage of charter school populations than they do in traditional public schools.

"Charter school students are in general more likely to be poor, more likely to be minority, more likely to have entered a charter school one or more grades behind others in terms of student achievement," adds Justin Tones, research director for the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation.

And despite claims that charter schools are not accountable, charter schools that fail do shut down after two to five years depending on state law, charter supporters say.

The Education Leaders Council released a statement stating there is no statistical difference in test results after accounting for race. "While these particular figures are false, we adamantly agree that in cases where a child attends a school that fails him, we must remove him from that situation," states CEO Lisa Graham Keegan. "Given the AFT reaction to what is a false conclusion, we can only assume that where, such a finding of failure is true, they will agree with us that the child needs a better choice. …

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