Rising to the Challenge Millburn Elementary Students Complete Fitness Marathon

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 13, 2004 | Go to article overview

Rising to the Challenge Millburn Elementary Students Complete Fitness Marathon


A recent physical fitness class lasted a bit longer than usual for 280 students at Millburn Elementary School.

The students participated in a 24-hour physical challenge.

The students were split into teams and took turns running or walking 2 1/2 miles each, said Dan Jazo, a physical education teacher at Millburn who organized the event.

"It was great," Jazo said. "All of the kids had a good time and everyone finished."

The challenge started at 9:30 a.m. on Oct. 1 and lasted until 9:30 a.m. on Oct 2.

Because of rain, the students were forced to run or walk some of the time inside the school.

"We thought bad weather might be a possibility, so we mapped out a trail inside the school beforehand," Jazo said.

There were 16 teams that participated in the event, with between 16 and 20 students on each team.

The number of participants this year was almost double the number of students who competed in the same event last year, Jazo said.

This was the third year Millburn has hosted the 24-hour fitness challenge.

It was also the first year parents were able to participate along side their kids, Jazo said.

Emmons goes on parade: All 400 or so Emmons Elementary District 33 students will parade on the sidewalks of downtown Antioch from 9 to 11 a.m. Monday.

Students will be bused to the area because they are raising money for an orphanage in Tanzania, Superintendent Matt Tabar said.

The group will start off in the parking lot of Orchard Street Mall until they hit Williams Park, where they will have a small program after completing the walk.

This is the first time the district has organized such a parade.

In addition to earning money for the orphanage, students are also going to send money to children who are victims of the recent Florida hurricanes.

Visit new middle school: The Round Lake area school district is celebrating the opening of Round Lake Middle School with an open house on Sunday.

The new school, located at 2000 N. Lotus Drive, Round Lake Heights, opened this year.

The building was funded by a referendum approved in 2000. The open house begins at 1 p.m. with a ribbon cutting, flag raising and speeches by local dignitaries.

Then the school will be open for tours from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Refreshments will also be served.

Grant students, get ready: Grant High School juniors who signed up to take the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test should be ready for the exam from 8 a.m. until 11 a.m. on Saturday.

The test takes place at the high school at the corner of Route 59 and Grand Avenue.

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