Las Vegas Turns 100

Manila Bulletin, November 3, 2004 | Go to article overview

Las Vegas Turns 100


Byline: LYNDA B. VALENCIA (PNA)

Las Vegas turns 100, and a year-long celebration of this milestone is celebrated from May 2004 through May 2005.

Las Vegas, built on a reputation, gambling, glitz and superstars matures into a one-stop, multi-dimensional resort destination in the last decade of the century.

At present, Las Vegas boasts of the largest hotels in the United States. The hotels and casinos there launched major campaigns to attain an international profile as a destination with exemplary service and fine dining.

Some of the officials of the Las Vegas Convention & Visitors Authority (LVCVA) were here recently to announce the neons city latest developments. They include Jo-Anna Palmer, manager, Asia Pacific Las Vegas Convention & Visitors Authority; Harry Kassap, administrator for market development, McCarran International Airport; Dan Shummy, vice president for sales, the Golden Nugget Las Vegas; Hylton Fothergill, international sales manager, Papillon Grand Canyon Helicopters.

Officials of PAL who attended were Felix Cruz, vice president for marketing support; Jess Garcia, assistant vice president for advertising and promotions; Gigi Exequiel, manager for advertising and promotions and Rolly Estabillo, vice president, Corporate Communications.

The countrys flag carrier PAL flies to Las Vegas four times a week via Vancouver.

For the first time ever, revenue generated from gaming in Las Vegas has exceeded. The non-gaming economic impact of the meetings, incentives, conventions, exhibitions (MICE) industry exceeded the gross gaming revenue in the Las Vegas metropolitan area for 2003 by US$400 million. The MICE industry generated US$6.5 billion in revenue in 2003.

Palmer said that the destination for the first time will be hosting major trade shows with 10,000 or more attendees during each month of 2004, adding "an inviting climate, flexible meeting spaces, new attractions and properties are some of the many reasons why Las Vegas remains one of the most sought-after MICE destinations in the world.

At the same time, the long awaited Las Vegas monorail started in July this year. "For the first time, visitors can travel the length of the Strip and out to Las Vegas Convention Center by monorail," she said.

The US$650 million system is predicted to carry 18 million passengers during its first year of operation.

Although Las Vegas is noted for its high-towered hotels, communications is not a problem as Pacific Bell partnered with Smart Communications, Inc. One can also direct to the Philippines at once.

The popular Fremont Street recently underwent a US$16.5 million facelift. Visitors enjoy free light shows, accompanied by concert quality sound, each hour after dark.

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