Reclaim Our Streets: STAY OFF THE BOOZE OR YOU'LL FACE JAIL; Threat to Binge Louts in Dramatic New Clampdown

The Mirror (London, England), November 13, 2004 | Go to article overview

Reclaim Our Streets: STAY OFF THE BOOZE OR YOU'LL FACE JAIL; Threat to Binge Louts in Dramatic New Clampdown


Byline: BOB ROBERTS Deputy Political Editor

DRUNKEN louts who fail random breath-tests could be jailed under dramatic new government plans.

In a major bid to stem alcohol- fuelled violence and crime, ministers may allow courts to bar boozed-up yobs from drinking.

Offenders could be breathalysed at any time to ensure they are sticking to the ban. If they fail, they could be jailed or ordered to have compulsory treatment.

The scheme is a huge boost to the Mirror's Reclaim Our Streets campaign. It was revealed as Britain's largest brewer put health warnings on its products in a drive to promote sensible drinking.

Home Secretary David Blunkett has already introduced anti-social behaviour orders to stop louts from going into certain areas, throwing fireworks or harassing neighbours.

He has also set up drug abstinence orders and compulsory treatment for junkies to cut the links between drugs and crime.

Now he has his sights on cutting the link between drink and crime on the streets and in the home.

There are more than one million incidents of alcohol-related violence every year.

A senior Home Office source said: "This would build on asbos and drug abstinence orders. If persistent offenders are linked to alcohol, courts could order them not to drink.

"The offenders could then be tested at any time to ensure they have not breached that order." Similar schemes are in place in the US. In the Commons, MPs have already called for alcohol abstinence orders to be introduced.

Tory MP Andrew Turner told ministers: "Too many of those who hit their wives or girlfriends, or commit other offences and disfigure our towns and cities, do so under the influence of drink. The forces of law and order have at their disposal many ways of dealing with the guilty. But as a society we have too few ways of preventing these crimes.

"We've successfully cut drink-driving with the breathalyser.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reclaim Our Streets: STAY OFF THE BOOZE OR YOU'LL FACE JAIL; Threat to Binge Louts in Dramatic New Clampdown
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.