Space Exploration

By Bowman, Karlyn | The American Enterprise, December 2004 | Go to article overview

Space Exploration


Bowman, Karlyn, The American Enterprise


When Americans are asked about the country's greatest achievement in the twentieth century, space exploration is mentioned most often. People see the space program as a source of scientific advances from which all Americans benefit. Eighty-five percent say our efforts in space contribute to the country's pride and patriotism.

Question: What would you say ...?

America's greatest
achievement during the
twentieth century is

Space exploration/
   Man on the moon   18%

        Technology   12

         Computers    7

     Medical care/
     breakthroughs    7

Note: Categories
registering less than 7
percent not shown. In
a separate question,
when asked about
"the U.S. government's
greatest achievement,"
14 percent, the top
response, mentioned
the space program.

Source: Pew Research Center for the
People & the Press April-May 1999

Note: Table made from bar graph.

Question: I'm going to read you a list of some changes that have taken place over the last 100 years. Please tell me if ...

Space exploration
has been a change
   for the better   72%

       Change for
        the worse    6

      Hasn't made
  much difference   17

Source: Pew Research Center for the
People & the Press April-May 1999

Note: Table made from bar graph.

Question: In your opinion, how much does the U.S. space program contribute to ...?

Scientific advances that all Americans can use

Some          45%
A lot         35%
Not much      13%
None at all    1%
Don't know     6%

CBS News, February 2003.

Note: Table made from pie chart.

National pride and patriotism

A lot         54%
Some          31%
Not much       9%
None at all    2%
Don't know     4%

CBS News, February 2003.

Note: Table made from pie chart.

Americans want to continue a manned space program. …

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