She Ignored a Terrible Child Abuse Scandal under Her Own Nose. Now She Preaches to Every Family in Britain; ANALYSIS

Daily Mail (London), November 27, 2004 | Go to article overview

She Ignored a Terrible Child Abuse Scandal under Her Own Nose. Now She Preaches to Every Family in Britain; ANALYSIS


Byline: PAUL EASTHAM

WITH her refined voice and air of grandeur, Margaret Hodge is referred to even by her closest lieutenants as 'Her Ladyship'. Clad in designer suits, the immaculately made-up multimillionaire Minister for Children resides in a gorgeous [pounds sterling]1.5million 18th century house in a desirable London street a few doors from where the Prime Minister used to live.

She enjoys weekends at her Norfolk country retreat.

It is difficult, therefore, for some people to recall that the Queen Bee of the Blairite social world rose to political prominence as an 'h' dropping, dungaree-clad radical socialist.

Or that Margaret Eve Hodge MBE once proudly flew the Red Flag over Islington Town Hall and displayed a bust of Lenin in the foyer.

At Islington she presided over an era of bizarre extremism and political correctness.

She even sent out a survey of Town Hall employee attitudes with the question: 'Do you consider yourself a man or a woman?' But as leader of the Socialist Republic of Islington she also presided over one of the worst sexual abuse scandals in local authority history - and refused for years to apologise for the terrible mistakes she made.

Her time as leader of the borough between 1982 and 1992 was dogged by claims of systematic abuse of children in care by council staff.

In February 1990, social workers Liz Davies and David Cofie uncovered incontrovertible evidence and incurred Mrs Hodge's wrath by warning local parents of telltale signs.

Then in April, a request from Mr Cofie asking for two extra staff for the local office carrying out an initial investigation into the sex abuse was turned down by Mrs Hodge in a memo. She described it as 'inappropriate'.

The two social workers continued their investigations and in 1991 believed they had finally reached a watershed when paedophile Roy Caterer, whose name Mrs Davies passed to the police, was jailed for seven-and-a-half years.

Disgusted that no further action was taken, Mrs Davies resigned in February 1992 and passed her information to Scotland Yard. On October 6 the Daily Mail's sister paper, London's Evening Standard, revealed evidence of abuse and child prostitution.

Mrs Hodge furiously attacked the newspaper's investigation on October 14 that year as ' gutter journalism'. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

She Ignored a Terrible Child Abuse Scandal under Her Own Nose. Now She Preaches to Every Family in Britain; ANALYSIS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.